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Terrorism and Security

MA/PgDip

School - School of Arts & Media

Subject area - Politics and History

Start Date(s): September; February

Duration:

Attendance mode of study (September intake only):
MA: One year full-time
PgDip: Eight months full-time  

Distance Learning mode of study (September and January intakes):
Distance Learning MA: Three years part-time
Distance Learning PgDip: Two years part-time

Fees:

Part-time - £1,260 per 30 credit module

UK - £7,560

International - £13,860

In Brief:

  • Learn from experts in global security and strategy who have published extensive research in respected political and historical journals
  • Develop a deep insight into global terrorism and security at a time of great change and uncertainty following the Arab Spring
  • Study modules dealing with various aspects of terrorism, counter-terrorism and security strategies
  • Part-time study option
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

Course Summary

This course enables you to take full advantage of the unrivalled research expertise of staff at the University of Salford in the areas of terrorism and security. It will introduce you to the key issues, concepts and theories of security and terrorism studies at an advanced level and equip you with the analytical tools to systematically assess the phenomenon of terrorism, its increasingly international character, and varying national and international responses to the problem. 

You will apply the concepts and theories of terrorism and security studies to ‘real world’ case studies and critically appraise their relevance for understanding ‘real world’ terrorism and security issues and critically evaluate the interaction between knowledge on security and terrorism issues and policy-making on these issues. On this course, you will gain the opportunity to continue life-long learning through an intellectually challenging programme of academic study, which focuses on topical and increasingly important issues in contemporary world politics

'The MA Terrorism and Security postgraduate programme simply exceeded my expectations. The faculty of instructors was very helpful and the course was encompassing. I would highly recommend this programme for prospective students interested in understanding how terrorism, intelligence and security affects the new world order.'
Francis Okpaleke (PG)
MA Terrorism and Security (2014/15)

Course Structure

This course has both full-time and part-time routes. The part-time route can be studied via distance learning.

For the full-time study option:
Semester 1: September to February
Semester 2: February to June
Semester 3: June to September

Full-time Structure by Attendance            

Semester 1                

Core modules:                

This module will provide you with an understanding of the issue of terrorism and a comprehension of some of the problems for democratic states and international organisations (EU, UN, NATO) in responding to this threat. You will acquire the analytical tools to systematically assess the phenomenon of        terrorism,        its        increasingly        international character, and varying national and international responses to the problem.                        
On this module, you will be led through discussions and analyses of many of the major terrorist and counter-terrorist campaigns seen in Europe since 1945. The module has a comparative element, and will provide students with an advanced understanding and critical awareness of the current state of scholarship on this field of study.                        

Semester 2                

Optional modules of up to 60 credits:                

On this module, you will be provided with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the issues raised by recent and current practices in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism. You will develop a comprehensive understanding of research and analytical techniques applicable to the examination current conceptual and practical developments in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism.      
This module offers you the chance to develop a critical understanding of the scope and nature of terrorism as it relates to the Middle East. You will develop the ability to differentiate between varying forms of terrorism in relation to the political and societal context from which they originate and        the        differing        domestic,        regional and international responses they provoke.                        
Since the late-nineteenth century, Britain has faced a number of threats to internal security. This module uses newly available primary documents to examine the British government’s response to terrorism, espionage and subversion from the formation of Scotland Yard’s Special ‘Irish’        Branch        in        1883,        set up to combat Fenian terrorism, to the present day counter-terror activities of the British Security Service (MI5) and police. In addition, the module explores how the British state has altered to meet individual threats, with sessions devoted to the Official Secrets Act, vetting and        anti-terror        legislation,        looking        at their impact on British political life and culture.                        
On this module you will gain a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of the major debates and discussions that have taken place within Strategic Studies and Security Studies over the last three decades.  This includes an understanding of the differences and points of overlap in        the        academic        disciplines of Terrorism Studies and Security Studies, a critical awareness of the different areas of interest and methodologies prevalent in Strategic Studies and Security Studies, and an advanced understanding of the way case studies are used to test theories and advance knowledge in these        fields.                        

Please note that the above list may be subject to change as the availability of optional modules varies each year.                  

Semester 3                

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.                  

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will      submit      a      6,000      word research paper.                

Part-time Structure by Attendance                

Year 1, Semester 1                

Core module                

  • Terrorism: Threat and Response (30 credits)                        

Year 1, Semester 2                

Choose one optional module from:                

  • Middle East and Terrorism (30 credits)                        
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (30 credits)                        
  • The Secret State: Domestic Security in Britain 1883 - 2012 (30 credits)                        

Year 2, Semester 1                

Core module:

  • Terrorism in Europe since 1945 (30 credits)
  •   

Year 2, Semester 2                

Choose one optional module from:                

  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (30 credits)                       
  • Middle East and Terrorism (30 credits)                        
  • Strategic and Security Studies (30 credits)                        
  • The Secret State: Domestic Security in Britain 1883 - 2012 (30 credits)                        

Year 3, Semesters 1, 2 and 3                

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.                

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will      submit a 6,000 word research paper. This course has a placement opportunities at a NATO Thinktank at Kalkar, Germany. Both face-to-face and distance learning students have the option of applying for a placement with Intelligence Fusion.    

Part-time Structure by Distance Learning    

September entry    

Year 1, September to January        

Core module:    

On this module you will gain an advanced understanding and critical awareness of case studies of terrorism and counter-terrorism in Europe since 1945, including the similarities and differences between these case studies.  You will also develop comprehensive knowledge and understanding of        the        current        state        of scholarship in this field of study.              

Year 1, February to June        

Core module:        

This module will provide you with an understanding of the issue of terrorism and a comprehension of some of the problems for democratic states and international organisations (EU, UN, NATO) in responding to this threat. You will acquire the analytical tools to systematically assess the phenomenon of        terrorism,        its        increasingly international character, and varying national and international responses to the problem.                  

Year 2, September to January      

Choose one optional module from:    

This module offers the chance to develop a critical understanding of the scope and nature of terrorism as it relates to the Middle East. You will develop the ability to differentiate between varying forms of terrorism in relation to the political and societal context from which they originate and the        differing        domestic,        regional        and international responses they provoke.                        
On this module, you will be provided with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the issues raised by recent and current practices in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism. You will develop a comprehensive understanding of research and analytical techniques applicable to the examination current conceptual and practical developments in security, intelligence, terrorism and counter-terrorism.
On this module you will gain a comprehensive understanding and critical awareness of the major debates and discussions that have taken place within Strategic Studies and Security Studies over the last three decades.  This includes an understanding of the differences and points of overlap in        the academic disciplines of Terrorism Studies and Security Studies, a critical awareness of the different areas of interest and methodologies prevalent in Strategic Studies and Security Studies, and an advanced understanding of the way case studies are used to test theories and advance knowledge in these        fields.            

Year 2, February to June                

Choose one optional module from:                

  • The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)                        
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)            

Please note that the above list may be subject to change as the availability of optional modules varies each year.        

Year 3, September to September                

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.        

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will      submit a 6,000 word research paper.    

Part-time Structure by Distance Learning:  

February entry  

Year 1, February to June  

Core module:  

  • Terrorism: Threat and Response (DL) (30 credits)    

Year 1, September to January  

Core module:  

  • Terrorism in Europe since 1945 (DL) (30 credits)    

Year 2, February to June  

Choose one optional module from:  

  • The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)    
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)    

Year 2, September to January  

Choose one optional module from:  

  • The Middle East and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)    
  • Contemporary Security, Intelligence and Terrorism (DL) (30 credits)
  • Strategic and Security Studies (DL) (30 credits)    

Please note that the above list may be subject to change as the availability of optional modules varies each year.  

Year 3, February to February (12 months)  

If you pass the taught component of the course you may then proceed to the 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits. Those not wishing to continue onto the dissertation project can be awarded the Postgraduate Diploma if leaving the course at this stage.  

You may replace the dissertation with the 60 credit Terrorism and Security Practicum, subject to the Programme Leader’s approval. This involves a work placement in an organisation, business or government department where terrorism and security concerns are dealt with on an ongoing basis. You will    submit a 6,000 word research paper.

@SalfordUni_PCH

Entry Requirements

A good honours degree (normally 2.1) in Social Sciences and Humanities such as History, Politics, English, Criminology, Sociology, and International Relations. Studies within Business, Library Science, Media Studies and Computer Science also considered.

An applicant with a 2:2 Honours Degree (or equivalent) may begin as a PgDip student. If the student passes all modules, s/he may progress to writing the dissertation to obtain the MA.

Applicants must have the equivalent of grade C or above, GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English.

Applicants are asked to submit a personal statement with their application.  A good personal statement explains why you want to do this course, why you want to do it now, and what skills you already have that will help you complete the course successfully.  A demonstration of an awareness of the demands of the course (intellectually and in terms of the time commitment) is also of benefit to those reviewing your application.

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

The Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process could help you to make your work and life experience count. The APL process can be used for entry onto courses or to give you exemptions from parts of your course.

Two forms of APL may be used for entry: the Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL) or the Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).

English Language Requirements

International students must provide evidence of proficiency in English- IELTS 6.5 band score (with no element below 5.5) as proof of this.

Suitable For

The professional relevance and topicality of this course will make it attractive to those considering or currently engaged in careers in the civil service, the armed forces, research and teaching, international or non-governmental organisations, and the media. The course also provides excellent foundations for those who wish to pursue a PhD.

Applicant profile

This course is suitable for any candidate with a relevant first degree in the social sciences or the humanities as well as for candidates that already work in security-related professions, including the military, police, government agencies, international organisations, the legal profession or private security companies. These students can take this course to gain a wider understanding of the issues they work with and to develop a solid academic and conceptual foundation for security-related professional tasks.

Fees 2018-19

Type of StudyFee
Full-time£7,560
Part-time£1,260 per 30 credit module
Full-time International£13,860

Additional costs

You should also consider further costs which may include books, stationery, printing, binding and general subsistence on trips and visits.

Scholarships and Bursaries

For more information please see our funding section.

Teaching

Teaching

On the Distance-Learning version of this course, the foundation for delivery is BlackBoard, the university’s virtual learning environment (VLE).  Using this as a content platform, each module site is organised into weekly packages.  These contain ‘bundles’ of files. These will normally include explanatory text, audio podcasts, directed readings, additional readings, and a variety of internal and external links.  You will also be provided with the lecture notes for the longer lectures in the attendance mode. We also provide you with the opportunity to interact with one another and their tutors through asynchronous discussion boards addressing seminar questions.

For some modules student blogs within the VLE are also used.  Essays are submitted and feedback is provided through our electronic submission system, Turnitin. Interaction with tutors beyond the VLE, such as dissertation supervision, is conducted by telephone and email.

Independent learning

When not engaging with the weekly ‘bundles’, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. Typically, this will involve reading journal articles and books, working on individual and group projects, undertaking research in the library, preparing coursework assignments and presentations, and preparing for examinations. Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities. All learning resources and teaching materials are available through VLE (blackboard or its equivalent). The expansion of ebooks and the contemporary nature of terrorism and security studies both mean that students are able to access all necessary materials through LASU without the need for extensive digitization of primary and secondary sources.

Assessment

Assessment

Assessments are designed in such a way that they make full use of the comparative advantages of the text-based subject area of politics and contemporary history. All assessments consist of written assignments with variations in terms of the length (different word counts for essays) and nature (essays vs. research reports). As a general rule, module performance is assessed through a maximum of two 3,500 word-essays/research reports per module. Some modules feature ‘seminar papers’ in which you will present a draft version of your essays or research reports for discussion by your peers and the module convenor.

In addition, attendance MA students are required to write a 14,000-word dissertation or undertake a Practicum.

Feedback

You will receive feedback on all practice assessments and on formal assessments undertaken by coursework. Feedback on examination performance is available upon request from the module leader. Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

We aim to provide you with feedback within 10 working days of hand-in (practice assessment) and 20 working days of hand-in (formal coursework assessment).

Postgraduate Staff Profile

Dr Samantha Newbery

Programme Leader and Personal Tutor for the MA in Terrorism and Security by part-time distance learning.  Dr Newbery is also the School of Arts and Media International Lead for the Middle East, and the Chair of Research Ethics for the School of Arts and Media and Salford Languages. She had two books published in 2015 (Interrogation, Intelligence and Security: Controversial British Techniques (Manchester University Press), and Why Spy? The Art of Intelligence (Hurst, co-authored with Brian Stewart). Dr Newbery’s current research focuses on Ireland vs UK (a case before the European Court of Human Rights, 1971-8), commissions of inquiry into matters relating to security, and alleged collusion between security forces and terrorist/paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland. 

More information is available at https://www.seek.salford.ac.uk/profiles/SNEWBERRY.jsp

Employability

Graduates from this course have secured a range of employment relevant to the subject. Alumni work at companies/organisations such as NATO, the British Army, Greater Manchester Police, Manchester Airport, the New York Police Department, Abu Dhabi police, Europol, private security companies and the International Criminal Court at the Hague.  Many students undertaking further study in this area will already work in security-related professions, including the military, police, government agencies, international organisations, the legal profession or private security companies. Others might take the course in order to help them get into security-related professions.

Career Prospects

You will develop a wide range of skills on the course (writing skills, communication skills, presentation skills, and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers. This means that you can follow a range of careers in the civil service, the armed forces, international or non-governmental organisations, think tanks and research institutions, and the media.

Alumni Profile

Robert Hampshire, MA Terrorism and Security

"Enrolling on the MA Terrorism and Security course at Salford was definitely one of the best decisions I have ever made, albeit perhaps not one of the easiest to accomplish by SAT-COM from somewhere in the middle of Afghanistan! However, I received some great support going through the application process. What I found when I joined Salford was an innovative course run by an international team of enthusiastic and very knowledgeable staff. The lecturers presented and discussed contemporary events whilst situating them in their broader context and encouraging debates amongst the students. This made the course very relevant to a practitioner with many years of experience in conflict and post-conflict zones like me. At the same time, our rather spirited discussions in the seminars strongly indicate that the students who entered the course directly after their undergraduate degree found the course as interesting and enjoyable as I did! In addition, I had the opportunity to attend the excellent European Security, Terrorism and Intelligence (ESTI) seminars and conferences with top experts in the field of terrorism and security. For all these reasons, I would strongly encourage anyone with an interest in security and terrorism issues to enrol on the MA Terrorism and Security at the University of Salford."

Francis Okpaleke, MA Terrorism and Security (2014/15)

"The MATS postgraduate programme simply exceeded my expectations. The faculty of instructors was very helpful and the course was encompassing. I would highly recommend this programme for prospective students interested in understanding how terrorism, intelligence and security affects the new world order."

Links with Industry

The course works with the relevant ‘industry’ in the subject-specific field, such as the military, police, or government agencies. Alumni work at companies/organisations such as NATO, the British Army, Greater Manchester Police, Manchester Airport, the New York Police Department, Abu Dhabi police, Europol, private security companies and the International Criminal Court at the Hague, and current students are the main beneficiaries from these existing links.  The course is not a training course for security professionals, but gives professionals an academic foundation and a comprehensive conceptual framework in Security and Terrorism Studies. Our assessments are tailored to academic development – something future employers want – rather than a training programme, though we focus on important transferrable skills.

Further Study

Completion of the MA Terrorism and Security qualifies students to apply for postgraduate research degrees (http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research).

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