Glossary

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Abstract
(noun) A short summary of the content of a longer piece of work, often used at the start of an article. ii) (adjective) A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. If one of your teachers says your writing is 'too abstract' it means too vague about a point by not explaining it in specific language, or by failing to ground it in theory or to use examples.

Academic
(noun) A teacher, lecturer or scholar in the University.

Academic induction
The period before teaching starts that acts as an introduction for new students to your course, school and the University.

Academic Progress Review tutor
A personal tutor is an academic member of staff who will act as a guiding support in a student's academic progress and university experience. Not every student has a personal tutor. Some students have Academic Progress Review tutors.

Academic misconduct
The Academic Misconduct Procedure is used to consider concerns raised around the integrity of work submitted for credit or award from the University. Plagiarism is one type of academic misconduct. Where academic misconduct is found to have occurred in a taught programme, an academic sanction must be applied. For students on postgraduate research degrees the normal sanction is expulsion.

Academic skills
These are the skills you use to learn, complete assessments and understand material in your course.

Academic year
The period of the year in which teaching is taking place, divided up into three trimesters. Many undergraduate students study in Trimesters 1 & 2 only, but other students will study in different patterns.

Address the question
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback on your work. It means 'make sure that you answering the question that is being asked'. Make sure your arguments and material are relevant and clearly linked to the question, and you are not simply writing everything you know about the topic.

Advantage
An online system where you can book your place on workshops and events run by the Library, Careers and Salford Postgraduate Research Training. It also gives you access to careers advice.

App
(noun) Short form of 'application'. A small programme which can be downloaded onto a mobile device such as a phone.

App launcher
Software that causes apps to open and run.

Analyse
(verb) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means break an issue into its constituent parts. Look in depth at each part using supporting arguments and evidence for and against as well as how these interrelate to one another.

Article
(noun) A piece of writing in a journal, magazine or newspaper.

askUS
This is the student advice site, where you can get help and support on a wide range of student issues, including accommodation, finances, Visas, wellbeing and disability support. You can visit the askUS desk in University House on weekdays or click the askUS link on the student hub to get help.

Assess
(verb) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means weigh up the extent to which something is true. Persuade the reader of your argument by citing relevant research, but also remember to point out any flaws and counter arguments. Conclude by stating clearly how far you are in agreement with the original proposition.

Assessment
(noun) An essay, an exam, presentation or another task which your teachers use to evaluate your progress. The mark from your assessment may count towards your final degree. See also summative assessment and formative assessment.

Assessment brief
(noun) The instructions for your assessment. Read them very carefully before you start.

Assistive technology
Specialist technology that enables disabled students to access information or mainstream technology independently.

B

Balanced argument
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. While it is often valuable to take a stance, be sure to present evidence for the other sides of the argument.

Bibliography
A full list of materials, (usually other books and journal articles) which an author has consulted when researching their work.

Blackboard
Blackboard is the Virtual Learning Environment used by the University of Salford. It is an online site you must log into regularly. It is where you access learning resources that are personal to you and the modules you are studying. Your module reading list is also in Blackboard. You will use Blackboard to upload assignments and communicate with your teachers and fellow students.

C

Campus
(noun) The location of the University buildings. The University has three campuses - Peel Park, Frederick Road and MediaCityUK.

Chapter
(noun) A numbered and/or titled section of a book; titles and details of chapters are often shown on the contents page at the front of the book.

Check out
(verb) Borrow. For example you may check out (borrow) a book from the library.

Citation
(noun) A reference to a specific piece of work (e.g. a book or journal article) used by another author within the text of their own writing (e.g. essay or dissertation). This is to make it clear that another original source has been used.

Clarify
(verb) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means make something clearer and, where appropriate, simplify it. This could involve, for example, explaining in simpler terms a complex process or theory, or the relationship between two variables.

Clarity
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. It refers to how clearly you communicate. So make sure the reader can easily understand what points you have made by writing clearly, and explaining why you have made these points. Sometimes this may mean writing in a straightforward way, not assuming the reader will automatically know what you were thinking.

Classmark
The letters and numbers appearing on the spine of a library item. Books, and other materials, are arranged by subject classmark on the shelves. You can browse using a classmark on Library Search.

Comment upon
(noun) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means choose the main points on a subject and give your opinion, reinforcing your point of view using logic and reference to relevant evidence, including any wider reading you have done.

Collaborate
i) (verb) Work together. ii) (noun) A web conferencing tool where staff and students can interact in an online environment in real time. Used for online lectures and webinars.

Compare
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means identify the similarities and differences between two or more phenomena. State if any of the shared similarities or differences are more important than others. 'Compare' and 'contrast' will often feature together in an essay question.

Concise
(adjective) A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. In your work you need to explain ideas clearly but with fewer words – if you have a word limit, make effective use of it! The marker may think you are waffling. Be succinct and avoid needlessly complicated words and phrases.

Concrete
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. Make sure you use clear and specific language to talk about a defined situation or a certain finding, not just vague ideas.

Consider
(noun) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means state what you think and have observed about something. Support your comments using appropriate evidence from external sources, or your own experience. Include any views which are contrary to your own and how they relate to what you originally thought.

Contrast
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It is similar to 'compare' but concentrate on the dissimilarities between two or more phenomena, or what sets them apart. Point out any differences which are particularly significant.

Copyright
Legal restrictions on how much of a book may be copied, and for what purposes. Notices posted near the photocopiers explain what may and may not be copied.

Credits
Each module you study is worth a certain number of credits. You need to gain a specific number of credits to pass each year of study.

Critically analyse
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback, or that you may see in an essay title or assessment task. It means show that you have actively thought about and questioned the claims you are describing or making. Even if the claims are completely valid, show that you haven't just accepted them at face value. Critical analysis is an important skill to learn at University. There are resources on the Skills website to help you develop your critical analysis.

Critically evaluate
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback, or that you may see in an essay title or assessment task. It means show that you have actively thought about and questioned the claims you are describing or making. Even if the claims are completely valid, show that you haven't just accepted them at face value. Give your verdict as to what extent a statement or findings within a piece of research are true, or to what extent you agree with them. Provide evidence taken from a wide range of sources which both agree with and contradict an argument. Come to a final conclusion, basing your decision on what you judge to be the most important factors and justify how you have made your choice. Critical analysis is an important skill to learn at University. There are resources on the Skills website to help you develop your critical analysis.

CRN
Short for Course Reference Number. Each module on Blackboard has a CRN.

D

Database
(noun) A searchable, electronic collection of items such as journal articles, theses, books, data, conference proceedings, statistics etc. that you can use to find out about a particular subject you are interested in. You will find information about databases, and access to them, in Library Search.

Deadline
noun) A deadline is a time or date before which a particular task must be finished or a particular thing must be done.

Dean
The head of the School. Each School has a Dean.

Define
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means to give the meaning of something in precise terms. Bring to attention any problems posed with the definition and different interpretations that may exist.

Demonstrate
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means show how, with examples to illustrate.

Depth
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. Make sure you explain your arguments in detail, using examples where appropriate and working through your ideas rather than simply referring to them briefly or in general terms.

Describe
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means provide a detailed explanation as to how and why something happens.

Dewey Decimal Number
A number code denoting the subject matter of a book, following the widely used Dewey Decimal Classification System.

Digital IT (DIT)
A university department which looks after the University's computers and software.

Discuss
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means use your skill at reasoning, backed up by carefully selected evidence, to make a case for and against an argument, or point out the advantages and disadvantages of a given context. Remember to arrive at a conclusion.

Dissertation
A piece of original academic work, usually written as a requirement for a bachelor’s or master's degree.

Draft
(noun) A draft is a version of your piece of writing. A first draft usually requires further work, while a final draft is ready for submission.

E

e-book
A book that is published electronically and is usually available online. Often there are print and electronic versions of a book but there are also some electronic-only titles.

Edition
(noun) A revised version of an existing publication may be issued as a separate edition.  A book may go through a number of different editions; each should have a separate catalogue entry.

e-journal
(noun) Electronic journal. A journal that is published electronically and is usually available online. Often there are print and electronic versions of a journal, but there are also some electronic-only titles.

Elaborate
A verb sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means to provide more information on, or give more detail on a subject.

e-Learning
An online guide, which usually includes video content to help you learn a particular skill.

Enquiry Desk
The Library has staffed enquiry desks at Clifford Whitworth Library, Allerton Learning Space and Media City Library. The desk staff can answer your questions about using the library.

Evaluate
See 'Critically evaluate'

Evidence
(noun) You need to provide reliable evidence in your assignments to support your ideas and conclusions. Evidence can come in many forms. For example, statistics, data, images and quotes are all types of evidence.

Exam/assessment board
(noun) An exam or assessment board is a committee of academic staff who meet to review and verify your grades.

Examine
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means look in close detail and establish the key facts and important issues surrounding a topic. You should try and offer reasons as to why the facts and issues you have identified are the most important, as well as explain the different ways they could be construed.

Explain
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means clarify a topic by giving a detailed account as to how and why it occurs, or what is meant by the use of this term in a particular context. Your writing should have clarity so that complex procedures or sequences of events can be understood, defining key terms where appropriate, and be substantiated with relevant research.

Explore
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means adopt a questioning approach and consider a variety of different viewpoints. Where possible reconcile opposing views by presenting a final line of argument.

F

Feedback
(noun) Information provided to you by the person teaching you, or by a peer, that is designed to show you where your work is good and where it can be improved so that, ultimately, your performance can improve. It's very important to read and learn from the feedback you receive it is the main form of guidance from your teachers. It can be formal feedback, written in response to something you have written, or informal feedback at any stage of your work.

Flair
A word sometimes used in grade descriptors or feedback. It means showing a sophisticated or elegant writing style, or presenting evidence in an original and insightful way.

Flow
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. It means creating a coherent argument by connecting points in a logical order to ensure that the work is easy to follow.

Formative
(adjective) Informal feedback that helps you improve your work, given before you hand your work in. Some types of assessment may also be described as formative, which means they are practice assessments. At Salford we refer to these as 'practice for success' opportunities.

G

Give an account of
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means give a detailed description of something. Not to be confused with ‘account for’ which asks you not only what, but why something happened.

H

I

Identify
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means determine what are the key points to be addressed and their implications.

Illustrate
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means give examples to support the points you make, ideally using evidence.

Independent study
This is study you do outside of timetabled sessions. You are expected to manage your own independent study. You might do your own research, read and take notes, visit the Library or arrange to meet with friends to prepare for your next tutorial. 

Induction
An introduction to University life.

Inter Library Loan
If the library does not have a copy of the book or item that you want, you may be able to make an inter-library loan request and we will try to borrow it from another library for you.

Interpret
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means demonstrate your understanding of an issue or topic. This can be the use of particular terminology by an author, or what the findings from a piece of research suggest to you. In the latter instance, comment on any significant patterns and causal relationships.

Introduction
(noun) The opening section of an essay or paper. Alternatively, the first session of a module.

ISBN
International Standard Book Number assigned by publishers to each distinct edition of a book.

ISSN
International Standard Serial Number, an identifier associated with a periodical title.

J

Journal
Alternatively known as a periodical, magazine or serial. A Journal is a publication which is produced in separate issues under a common title, either regularly (e.g. quarterly) or sometimes at more irregular intervals.

Justify
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means make a case by providing a body of evidence to support your ideas and points of view. In order to present a balanced argument, consider opinions which may run contrary to your own before stating your conclusion.

K

L

Late penalties
A punishment issued by the university because a student has handed in their work after the deadline.

Learning pathway
A course available on LinkedIn Learning to help you learn a particular skill.

Lecture
A lecture is an oral presentation intended to teach you about a particular subject on the course.

Lecturer
An academic member of staff who is an expert in their field and will be involved in carrying out research as well as teaching. 

Library card
Your University card is also your library card.

Library Search
The online site where you can find all the academic resources that the Library has, including books, electonic books, journals, articles and more.

Literarture review
A summary and critical evaluation of previous research on a topic. You may be asked to write one as a standalone assignment, or it may form part of a bigger piece of work, such as a disseration or thesis.

Loan allowance
How many items you can borrow.

M

Mark scheme
See 'rubric'.

Mathscope
A support unit for students who may experience difficulties with mathematics in whatever subject you are studying.

Mature student
Any student over the age of 21. 

Multi-functional devices (MFD)
These are the photocopy, print and scan machines.

Microsite
An area of the Student Hub dedicated to your school’s latest news, events and opportunities.

Module
Each course is divided into a smaller units of study called modules. Some modules on your course will be core (compulsory) and others you can choose to study (optional).

Module leader/coordinator
The tutor who is responsible for running a module. 

Module handbook
A useful document that contains basic information about a module such as what you will learn, what type of assessments you will need to do and when the deadlines are.

N

NUS
National Union of Students. The NUS represents students’ interests nationally. Amongst other services, you can purchase the NUS Extra card, which gives discounts for shopping, entertainment, eating out, travel and more. 

O

Office hours
Specific times during the week when your tutors are available to answer student queries. They may advertise these times on their office door, Blackboard or on their email signature. 

Optional module
See 'module'.

Oral presentation
See 'presentation'.

Originality
A term that is sometimes used in grade descriptors. It means demonstrating your own thinking, perhaps by drawing upon research beyond what you learned about in class, to make an argument that not every student would have thought of.

Outline
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means convey the main points, placing emphasis on global structures and interrelationships rather than minute detail

Outlook
An email system provided by Microsoft. Your University email is an Outlook account.

P

Paper/research paper
See 'article'

Penalties
(noun, plural). A penalty is a punishment that someone is given for doing something which is against a law or rule.

Periodical
Alternatively known as a journal or serial. A Periodical is a publication which is produced in separate issues under a common title, either regularly (e.g. quarterly) or sometimes at more irregular intervals.

Personal tutor
A personal tutor is an academic member of staff who can help you with academic and non-academic issues and assist you in accessing other support services. Not every student has a personal tutor some students have Academic Progress Review tutors.

PIN
Your library PIN is your personal 4 digit number which identifies you as the owner of your card.

Plagiarism
Passing off someone else’s work as your own, either intentionally or unintentionally, by failing to acknowledge the original source.

PMC (or Personal Mitigating Circumstances)
This is a process to apply to change the deadline of an assignment if there were circumstances out of your control that meant you couldn’t complete it in time. Note you should always try to submit your work by the deadline and only use a PMC when absolutely needed.

Portfolio
(noun). A collection of examples of your work. On some courses students are asked to create a portfolio for assessment.

Postgraduate
A student who has completed an undergraduate degree and is now studying a higher degree such as a Masters. 

Practical/lab class
A hands-on learning opportunity. A practical or lab class may involve conducting or observing an experiment or practising a technique

Practice for success
(adjective) An opportunity to do some work to get informal feedback that helps you improve.

Presentation
(noun) A formal talk in front of an audience, often using technology such as PowerPoint to illustrate your ideas.

Print credit
Credit on your record that allows you to print, copy, scan. This can be topped up online and at pay stations.

Project
(noun) A type of assessment. A detailed study of a subject. A group project is done by a group of students.

Professor
This is the highest academic rank in a University. A professor is an expert in their subject area and is involved in research and teaching activities. 

Programme leader
The academic member of staff responsible for your programme/course.

Programme (of study)
This is your course – e.g. Film Production, Zoology, Adult Nursing.

Proof read
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. Read your work carefully before you submit it, or get another person to read it, to check for spelling and grammar mistakes. You should also check that your arguments make sense, and that everything is phrased clearly.

Q

R

Range of material
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. It means try and use more than just the material provided by the lecturers, and avoid basing too much of your work on just one or two references.

Reading list
A list of books, journal articles etc. that students are expected to read as part of their course.

Reasonable adjustment plan
Reasonable Adjustment Plan / Student Support Plan is a plan of academic support put in place to ensure that students identified as having a disability or specific learning difficulty are not put at a disadvantage to their peers and have fair and equal access to their education.  

Reference book or material
An item which is for consultation within the Library only.

Referencing
The process of accurately and consistently recording details of all resources used in a piece of academic writing to acknowledge the work of others and avoid plagiarism.

Request
Process that allows you to ask for a book you want when all the copies are out on loan.

Resit/retake
(verb) If someone resits a test or examination, they take it again, usually because they failed the first time.

Reassessment
(noun) If you are asked to do a reassessment, it means you will need to do an assesssment again, usually because you failed the first time.

Resubmit
(verb) If you need to resubmit a piece of assessed work, it usually means you have failed with your first submission. Se 'Submission'.

Resource
(noun) A helpful or informative piece of material, such as a study guide or piece of e-learning.

Return
To bring back an item that you have borrowed, in a way that takes it off your library record.

Review
A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means Look thoroughly into a subject. This should be a critical assessment and not merely descriptive.

Review article
An article that summarises and critically evaluates previously published research on a topic. See 'article' and 'literature review'.

Roll number
Your roll number means your student ID a unique number assigned to you. You will use it to access some systems. It is presented as @00123456.

Rubric
(noun) A set of rules that your teachers use to mark students work. You can usually find the rubric for a module on Blackboard.

S

Scan
To make a digital copy of an item.

School
The University is divided into four Schools. Each school teaches a related set of subjects. Our schools are School of Arts, Media & Creative Technology; Salford Business School; School of Health & Society; School of Science, Engineering and Environment. We also have Salford Languages, the University’s English Language and Modern Foreign Languages Teaching Centre.

SCONUL Access
A scheme providing borrowing or reference access for students and academic staff to over 170 university libraries in the U.K and Ireland. Please note This service is currently suspended due to the Covid 19 pandemic.

Show how
A phrase sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means present, in a logical order, and with reference to relevant evidence, the stages and combination of factors that give rise to something.

SPA (or Student Progression Administrator)
A staff member in your school who helps students to stay on track with progressing through their course. They can support you if you are having issues with your academic progression and can offer advice to stop you becoming overwhelmed.

Self-service machines
Located on the ground floor of Clifford Whitworth Library, near the courtyard. You use them to borrow books.

Seminal evidence
A seminar is a mixture between a lecture and a tutorial. You often need to prepare for seminars before attending. These will be led by an academic and include anywhere up to 40 students (sometimes a few more on popular courses). This may differ from course to course.

Seminar
A seminar is a mixture between a lecture and a tutorial. You often need to prepare for seminars before attending. These will be led by an academic and include anywhere up to 40 students (sometimes a few more on popular courses). This may differ from course to course.

Seminar tutor
A member of academic staff who leads the seminar group and facilitates seminar activities. 

Shelfmark
See 'Classmark'.

Similarity score
The percentage of text from your written work that matches other submitted work or sources. See 'Turnitin'.

Source
(noun) An academic piece of evidence, for example, a journal article or book.

Specific (adjective)
A word your teachers may use when they give you feedback. It means give a more precise and detailed account of what is being described, drawing on particular examples.

State
(verb) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means specify in clear terms the key aspects of a topic without being too descriptive. Refer to evidence and examples where appropriate.

Structure
(noun or verb) A word your teachers may use when they give you feedback. Structure is a way of presenting your work so the reader can follow the argument. Make sure your paragraphs are in a logical order, that you show the connections between different paragraphs, and that each section has good beginning and ending sentences.

Student Hub (student.salford.ac.uk)
A website for students at the University of Salford.

Student ID
Also sometimes called roll number. It means your student ID a unique number assigned to you. You will use it to access some systems. It is presented as @00123456.

Student ID card
A card that identifies you as a student at Salford. You will need it for many things, for example borrowing books, laptops and equipment, printing, photocopying and scanning, accessing specialist rooms, using the bike shelters, catching the number 50 and 51 buses between the main campus and MediaCityUK.

Student rep
Also called a student representative. A student in your year who is nominated to represent your opinions, concerns and feedback about the course at Staff-Student Committee meetings.

Student Support Plan (also called a Reasonable Adjustment Plan).
A plan of academic support put in place to ensure that students identified as having a disability or specific learning difficulty are not put at a disadvantage to their peers and have fair and equal access to their education. 

Students' Union (also called USSU - the University of Salford Students' Union).
The Students' Union is a team of student-elected representatives, independent of the University, who work to ensure all students are supported. USSU also offer a diverse range of social opportunities for all students.  

Submission
(noun) A piece of assessed work that you hand in (submit) to be marked, usually on Blackboard.

Submit
(verb) If someone submits their work, it means they hand it in to be marked. At Salford, work is handed in online through Blackboard.

Summarise
(verb) A word sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means Give a short version drawing out the main facts and omit superfluous information. Brief or general examples will normally suffice for this kind of answer.

Summative
(adjective) A word your teachers may use in relation to an assessed piece of work. For example, a summative assessment.

Synthesise
(verb) A word your teachers may use when they give you feedback or sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It means show how different sources and theories go together to make a good argument. A lack of synthesis could mean your essay reads more like a list of research than an argument.

T

Teams
Microsoft Teams is an online tool where you can talk to others through video calls, and share your work. Occasionally some teaching sessions may be held online on Teams. You can access it for free through your student Office365 account.

Thesis
In the UK, thesis usually means an unpublished work submitted for a doctoral degree, while a dissertation is a work produced at undergraduate or masters' level.

Timetable – personal timetable
Your personal timetable shows all the teaching sessions that you should attend, either in person or online.

Timetable – programme timetable
Your programme timetable shows all the teaching scheduled for the entire course, which means you’ll see all groups for each module on the course timetable.

To what extent
A phrase sometimes used in an essay title or assessment task. It has a similar meaning to 'How far...?'. This type of question calls for a thorough assessment of the evidence in presenting your argument. Explore alternative explanations where they exist.

Transparent
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. It means the thought-process which underlies your argument must be clearly expressed. Even if you have a good idea, it’s not always easy for the marker to see your train of thought.

Trimester
The academic year is divided into three trimesters which begin in September, February and June. Each trimester is 14 weeks long.  You may also hear your tutors refer to these as semesters. 

Turnitin              
(noun) Turnitin is an online tool to upload your work so that it can be marked and checked for similarity. You access Turnitin from Blackboard.

Tutor
A member of academic staff (noun) who teaches. See also Seminar Tutor and Personal Tutor.

Tutorial
A tutorial is where you meet an academic either for a one-to-one session or as a small group, usually taking place in a smaller room than a lecture or a seminar.

U

Undergraduate
A student who is studying their first degree.

University email
Your university email comes as part of your free University Office365 account. All official communications from the University are sent to this address, so it's very important to check it regularly.

Unsubstantiated claims
A term that your teachers may use when they give you feedback. An unsubstantiated claim lacks evidence. Make sure you justify your argument by supporting each point with empirical evidence and references. This will create a more persuasive argument.

Username
(noun) Your Salford identification number which is required for accessing personal computers, laptops and resources when not on campus.

USIR
University of Salford Institutional Repository. A store of all research outputs produced by University of Salford staff and postgraduate researchers. USIR content can be accessed through Library Search.

USSU
The University of Salford Students' Union. The Students' Union is a team of student-elected representatives, independent of the University, who work to ensure all students are supported. USSU also offer a diverse range of social opportunities for all students.

V

Venue
(noun) The venue for an event or activity is the place where it will happen.

Virtual Learning Environment
A Virtual Learning Environment is a web-based platform for the digital aspects of courses of study. Blackboard is the Virtual Learning Environment used by the University of Salford. This is where you can upload assignments, access course documents and resources, as well as communicate with staff and students. You are expected to log in to Blackboard regularly.

W

Webinar
(noun) An online seminar, workshop or lecture.

Welcome
Welcome is a period of time before your first trimester starts, including the period of events that introduce you to the University and Student life. You may have also heard this referred to as ‘Welcome Week’ or ‘Freshers’.

Wildcard
(noun) A symbol used as a substitute for one or more characters when searching for variant spellings or forms of a word e.g. organisation will search for organisation and organization.

Wordscope
A writing workshop to help you improve and develop your academic writing skills.

X

Y

Z