BA (Hons) English Multidiscipline - English Language and Creative Writing route

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Our English Language and Creative Writing route will give budding writers the opportunity to both develop your writing and to understand more about the building blocks of language as a primary tool of creative expression. You will develop your creative craft while learning about the structure, history and applications of the English language. 

BA (Hons) English Multidiscipline at the University of Salford is taught by practising writers and linguistic researchers, offering an environment in which your talent will be nurtured and valued. The degree is designed so that you can pick the route that is right for you, tailored to your interests. By opting for the English Language and Creative Writing route, you will be able to take English Language modules in areas as diverse as language acquisition, the relationship between language and big data, the history of English and the linguistic and cultural representations of northern identity. Moreover, our Creative Writing staff are professional and practicing writers with interests as diverse as experimental poetry, graphic novels, thriller novels and writing for television.

The course offers career focused options such as community writing projects, a work placement opportunity, the chance to study abroad, and masterclasses from professional writers and editors. Past masterclasses have involved practitioners from the BBC, Harper Collins, Hachette, and authors including Kit De Waal, Jackie Kay, and Emma Flint.

Apply through UCAS for BA (Hons) English Multidiscipline: course code Q307, institution code S03. 

Click for more information on how to apply

Use the dropdown boxes below to discover the range of modules available to you on the course if you choose to follow the English Language and Creative Writing route. Some will be core, and then you'll have the flexibility to pick and choose others to tailor your learning to your specific interests.

Year one modules

Critical Skills in the Twenty-First Century

On this module you will be introduced to the skills required for life in contemporary society. The module covers skills including: argumentation, critical thinking, and clarity in written expression through the filter of “big ideas” ranging from artificial intelligence to ecocriticism.

Introducing Language

This module will introduce you to the systematic study of language, with a focus on how English is organised in terms of its sounds, structures, meaning and mental representations.

The Writer's Practice

Start your writing life by exploring the creative process in a range of mediums: poetry, prose fiction, playwriting and memoir. You will be challenged to define your territory as a writer and inspired by new creative processes. In your first year at Salford, you experiment with all your talents and discover your own writing practice. 

Year two modules

Either History and Diversity in English or The Structure of English

History and Diversity in English

You will be introduced to key periods in the history of the English language and characteristic features of the language in these periods. You will explore language change with reference to the different levels of language and regional variation and change in English dialects.

The Structure of English

Starting from an investigation of a wide range of grammatical phenomena and constructions in modern standard English, you will develop a firm grounding in the analysis of the structure of English sentences. You will learn how to analyse and think critically about data, how to formulate rules and hypotheses, and how to test them.

 

Either Sounds of English or Truth and Meaning

Sounds of English

The sound system of English is organised by subconscious principles that shape the content of speech sounds and their patterns of occurrence. This module introduces you to the sounds of speech, syllable structure and word stress in English. You will learn how to describe and classify consonants and vowels, transcribe speech sounds, and identify and analyse syllable structure and word stress.

Truth and Meaning

How can we understand the meaning of sentences we have never heard before? You will examine the role that truth plays in the study of meaning, and learn how to analyse the meaning of English words and sentences. The module will also prepare you to seek answers to further questions about meaning in English.

You will choose 40 credits from these Creative Writing modules:

Introduction to Children’s Literature (20 credits)

You will look at the development of literature for children since 1744 and  examine how child development determines the content within texts written for children. You will scrutinise the texts from many angles and you may even produce texts for children.

Writing Poetry in the 21st Century (20 credits)

This module revisits some traditional forms. The first part of the module involves creative exploration of the Japanese ‘tanka’ (a relative of the haiku), the sonnet and the sestina and invites you to invent your own original poetic form. In the second part of the module you will encounter a range of innovative approaches to poetry: using sound, collage, found text and visual elements in your writing. The format will be largely workshop-based with writing exercises, sharing work with your tutor.

Introduction to Screenwriting (20 credits)

You will examine fundamental aspects of storytelling: narrative structure, character development, character types, relation of character to plot, the use of subplots. You explore differing conceptual and technical approaches in scriptwriting for theatre, TV and film.

Playwriting (20 credits)

You will learn skills of analysing and writing plays for the stage. The module covers history of playwriting, an introduction to the playwriting industry and the development of skills in areas such as concept, story, structure, characterisation and dialogue. You will have the chance to work with professional playwrights in this course and write a play for your assessment.

Researching and Planning a Novel (20 credits)

This module will equip you with an overview of the state of contemporary fiction. You will meet a broad range of contemporary practice, from literary fiction to experimental fiction and genre fiction, including ‘chick lit’, historical fiction, crime/thrillers, science fiction, and supernatural/fantasy fiction. You will continue to develop your ‘writer’s tool-kit’, adding techniques such as point of view, narrative drive, setting, character and dialogue. 

Lives Online: Writing The Self and the Digital Age (20 credits)

We live in two worlds, the online and the ‘real’. What does it mean to have an online identity and persona? What is the relationship between who you are in real life, and the identity you live online? What does it mean for our mental health and the relationships? In this module you will explore the state of current thought and theory about the digital self, while at the same time playing creatively with virtual representations of the self.

Writing in Action (20 credits)

The writing life can be lived beyond books and literature. On this module, you will learn how creative writing skills can be applied in community settings; as campaigning, activism, community building, and therapy. You will explore your writing in a community setting and for practical purposes.

Political Communication: Media and Democracy (20 credits)

This module explores the relationship between the media and politics in liberal democracies. You will focus on the nature of political media and reporting, the media's influence on politics, and how political actors use the media. You will also study the rise of the internet and new media technologies and what this means for democracy.

Professional Writing for the Culture Industries (20 credits)

This module introduces you to various forms of professional writing and current debates in theatre and the arts industry today. You will review shows, write articles or blogs on current trends in theatre, and discuss the issues that interest you most in a series of panel discussions.

You will then choose 40 credits from these modules:

English Language 

History and Diversity in English (20 credits)

You will be introduced to key periods in the history of the English language and characteristic features of the language in these periods. You will explore language change with reference to the different levels of language and regional variation and change in English dialects.

The Structure of English (20 credits)

Starting from an investigation of a wide range of grammatical phenomena and constructions in modern standard English, you will develop a firm grounding in the analysis of the structure of English sentences. You will learn how to analyse and think critically about data, how to formulate rules and hypotheses, and how to test them.

Sounds of English (20 credits)

The sound system of English is organised by subconscious principles that shape the content of speech sounds and their patterns of occurrence. This module introduces you to the sounds of speech, syllable structure and word stress in English. You will learn how to describe and classify consonants and vowels, transcribe speech sounds, and identify and analyse syllable structure and word stress.

Truth and Meaning (20 credits)

How can we understand the meaning of sentences we have never heard before? You will examine the role that truth plays in the study of meaning, and learn how to analyse the meaning of English words and sentences. The module will also prepare you to seek answers to further questions about meaning in English.

Political Communication: Media and Democracy (20 credits)

This module explores the relationship between the media and politics in liberal democracies. You will focus on the nature of political media and reporting, the media's influence on politics, and how political actors use the media. You will also study the rise of the internet and new media technologies and what this means for democracy.

Language and Big Data (20 credits)

The British National Corpus is a vast collection of over 4,000 English texts, providing a unique record of contemporary spoken and written English. In this module you will gain hands-on experience in using this and other computer-based corpora of English to answer questions about language structure and use.

Analysing Media Texts (20 credits)

In this module, we will explore what constitutes a media text in the 21st century. You will learn how to deconstruct media texts using tools from linguistics in order to explore ideology and manipulation in texts.

Key Issues in TESOL (20 credits)

This module introduces you to key concepts underlying TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) methodology. You will become familiar with the basic approaches, materials and procedures and the principles of lesson planning and classroom management.

Language Acquisition (20 credits)

Children master the basics of their first language without formal instruction from a very early age. How do they do it? What exactly do they learn? What stages do they go through? You will examine the answers to questions like these by studying the cognitive mechanisms behind the acquisition process.

English Multidiscipline Work Placement Module (20 credits)

This module offers you the opportunity to spend a trimester working on a placement of your choice. Students will be helped to identify work placements in a career related to their aspirations and supported in their applications and CV writing. You will work with a personal tutor to reflect upon and produce a narrative assessment of your professional learning and goals.

 

English Literature

The Female Gothic (20 credits)

You will analyse a selection of Gothic novels and novellas by women, and learn about the themes of Gothic writing as well as explore the significance of various recurrent tropes and features such as: the uncanny, Gothic spaces and places, the absent/dead mother, voyeurism and surveillance.

The Romantic Period: The Sublime and the Gothic (20 credits)

Study literature emerging in a time of revolution and consider themes such as the rights of man, of woman, and of slaves, the sublime, childhood, empire, the self, and the gothic. This literary period refines and develops literary forms and styles from previous eras, as well as pursuing artistic experimentation, so this module explores language and form in detail in relation to key themes within their historical and cultural context.

Victorian Literature: Progress and Panic (20 credits)

You will enhance your skills in close analysis, studying 19th Century writing within a range of historical and theoretical contexts. Texts include novels, poetry, and non-fiction and the module covers a range of issues including class, culture, urban experience, women’s writing, decadence and identity.

World Literature and the Environment (20 credits)

This module introduces students to a range of global literatures that engage with environmental issues such as the climate emergency, "natural" disasters, green capitalism, biodiversity loss and extinction, waste and pollution, and Indigenous resistance. Taking in literature from across Africa, Asia, Australasia, the Americas and Europe, this module asks students to consider the role of literature in addressing planetary crises and working towards preferred futures.

Utopias and Dystopias (20 credits)

Learn to understand the complex relationship between utopian ‘thinking’ and ‘real-world’ thinking by studying and debating representations of utopian societies; you will also study a variety of dystopian texts by authors such as Anthony Burgess, Margaret Atwood, George Orwell, and Ray Bradbury.

From Salvation to Damnation (20 credits)

In this module you will look at dramatic texts other than Shakespeare’s from the late Medieval to the Jacobean period, roughly 1500-1630. In particular, you will investigate how issues of sexuality, politics, religion, and identity are treated during this period. The module also asks you to consider a range of different theatrical traditions of staging and stagecraft from the period, in order to encourage an appreciation of how those traditions were kept alive on the stage.  

Literature, Adaptation, and the Screen (20 credits)

On this module, you will study a range of literary texts and their screen counterparts, including SherlockPsycho, and Gone Girl. Topics for seminar discussion may include: theories of adaptation and genre; issues of authorship/ auteurship; the integral role of technical arts such as scenography, music, sound production; the importance of context. Students will also be introduced to the writing techniques associated with adaptation: treatments, synopses, step outlines and script writing.

21st Century Women’s Writing (20 credits)

This module will explore a range of contemporary texts written by women and will include novels, short stories, poetry and other forms of writing including memoirs, creative non-fiction, and journalism. As a consequence, you will learn about the socio-political and cultural climate of today’s society as it affects and is shaped by women.

English Multidiscipline Work Placement Module (20 credits)

This module offers you the opportunity to spend a trimester working on a placement of your choice. Students will be helped to identify work placements in a career related to their aspirations and supported in their applications and CV writing. You will work with a personal tutor to reflect upon and produce a narrative assessment of your professional learning and goals.

 

Creative Writing

Introduction to Children’s Literature (20 credits)

You will look at the development of literature for children since 1744 and  examine how child development determines the content within texts written for children. You will scrutinise the texts from many angles and you may even produce texts for children.

Writing Poetry in the 21st Century (20 credits)

This module revisits some traditional forms. The first part of the module involves creative exploration of the Japanese ‘tanka’ (a relative of the haiku), the sonnet and the sestina and invites you to invent your own original poetic form. In the second part of the module you will encounter a range of innovative approaches to poetry: using sound, collage, found text and visual elements in your writing. The format will be largely workshop-based with writing exercises, sharing work with your tutor.

Introduction to Screenwriting (20 credits)

You will examine fundamental aspects of storytelling: narrative structure, character development, character types, relation of character to plot, the use of subplots. You explore differing conceptual and technical approaches in scriptwriting for theatre, TV and film.

Playwriting (20 credits)

You will learn skills of analysing and writing plays for the stage. The module covers history of playwriting, an introduction to the playwriting industry and the development of skills in areas such as concept, story, structure, characterisation and dialogue. You will have the chance to work with professional playwrights in this course and write a play for your assessment.

Researching and Planning a Novel (20 credits)

This module will equip you with an overview of the state of contemporary fiction. You will meet a broad range of contemporary practice, from literary fiction to experimental fiction and genre fiction, including ‘chick lit’, historical fiction, crime/thrillers, science fiction, and supernatural/fantasy fiction. You will continue to develop your ‘writer’s tool-kit’, adding techniques such as point of view, narrative drive, setting, character and dialogue. 

Lives Online: Writing The Self and the Digital Age (20 credits)

We live in two worlds, the online and the ‘real’. What does it mean to have an online identity and persona? What is the relationship between who you are in real life, and the identity you live online? What does it mean for our mental health and the relationships? In this module you will explore the state of current thought and theory about the digital self, while at the same time playing creatively with virtual representations of the self.

Writing in Action (20 credits)

The writing life can be lived beyond books and literature. On this module, you will learn how creative writing skills can be applied in community settings; as campaigning, activism, community building, and therapy. You will explore your writing in a community setting and for practical purposes.

English Multidiscipline Work Placement Module (20 credits)

This module offers you the opportunity to spend a trimester working on a placement of your choice. Students will be helped to identify work placements in a career related to their aspirations and supported in their applications and CV writing. You will work with a personal tutor to reflect upon and produce a narrative assessment of your professional learning and goals.

 

Drama

Theatre and Communities (20 credits)

The module provides students with a practical knowledge and theoretical understanding of the uses, applications and value of drama and theatre as an aspect of social engagement and personal empowerment outside of the conventional theatre environment. The module explores the history of the 'form', and key practitioners and areas of contemporary practice. Practitioners/companies may include Cardboard Citizens, 7.84, TiPP, Geese Theatre UK, and Clean Break

Introduction to Theatre Directing (20 credits)

In the first part of the module, a series of workshop/seminars will introduce you to the role of the director, using a range of contemporary and historical play texts.  We will explore and apply appropriate theatrical vocabularies in order to help you develop your own directorial approach.

Theatre Adaptation: Writers and Devisers (20 credits)

In this module, you will study a range of performances which have been adapted to stage from other forms e.g. myths, short stories, music, poetry or novels and you will create your own. We’ll help you develop your knowledge of adaptation methodologies including cultural and temporal transposition, appropriation and deconstruction. You will use this knowledge along with close analysis of the original texts to help you write, devise and perform your own adaptation.

Shakespeare in Performance (20 credits)

You explore Shakespeare’s plays through performing them and through deconstructing performances of them. You also enjoy the opportunity here of working with students on other degree programmes. 

Page to Stage: Drama Texts in Translation (20 credits)

You will develop a practical and theoretical understanding of a range of 20th/21st century theatre texts in translation and the ability to interpret dramatic texts, whilst fostering an understanding of the particular ideological and cultural implications of staging plays in translation. You will be able to direct and perform in extracts of the translated plays studied.

English Multidiscipline Work Placement Module (20 credits)

This module offers you the opportunity to spend a trimester working on a placement of your choice. Students will be helped to identify work placements in a career related to their aspirations and supported in their applications and CV writing. You will work with a personal tutor to reflect upon and produce a narrative assessment of your professional learning and goals.

 

Other

University Wide Language Programme (20 credits)

This module provides the opportunity to learn or develop a language with the University-wide language programme.

Year three modules

Northern Voices

What does it mean to be ‘northern’? Where is the north and where does it begin and end? Using both archive and contemporary recordings of northern speech, this research-based module will enable you to carry out a project on an aspect of northern identity as expressed through language in the interactional and media domains.

Language and Communication

How does communication work? In this module you will examine key aspects of communication which result from the interaction of linguistic meaning, context and principles of human cognition. You will study how language is used in context by analysing data drawn from your own experience in communication.

Final Portfolio

This is a double creative writing module that runs throughout your final year. Here you can undertake a self-directed project in the genre(s) of your choosing, while giving and receiving feedback in a supportive workshop environment. By the end of the module you should have 6,000 words (or equivalent) of highly polished creative work.

You will then choose 40 credits from these modules:

English Language

Teaching English Language (20 credits)

Using what you have learned on your degree, you will apply your skills in the English Language classroom, giving you a firm foundation from which to contemplate a teaching qualification, or simply the skills to start your own private teaching practice.

Health Communication (20 credits)

In this module, you will explore healthcare communication using a range of theories and methods in linguistics ranging from corpus linguistics to conversation analysis. You will analyse language data from a diverse range of healthcare settings, such as clinical consultations, online discussions, public health campaigns and press reports.

The Grammar of Words (20 credits)

Words play an integral part in our ability to use language creatively. In this module you will develop a coherent understanding of key concepts in word formation (‘morphology’) and you will have opportunity to analyse morphological data from contemporary English, comparing and critically evaluating the strengths and weakness of current theoretical approaches to morphology.

Understanding Speech (20 credits)

Most users of language are able to produce and recognise speech very easily. This module examines the various psycholinguistic models of speech processing that try to account for this phenomenon.

Critical Issues in TESOL (20 credits)

You will develop an understanding of the global context of English language teaching and of the approaches, materials, and techniques of English language teaching to non-native speakers. You will be introduced to language learning needs analysis and develop the ability to plan and manage sequences of English language lessons.

Contemporary Trends in the Study of Language (20 credits)

This is a ‘hybrid’ module that builds on concepts, theories and methods you have studied in your degree programme, further developing your knowledge of the latest research in English language and linguistic inquiry.

The Language Project (40 credits)

The Language Project is an exciting opportunity to apply your knowledge of language to a project of your own choosing. This module will be delivered across the whole academic year, starting with several weeks of taught sessions where you will be encouraged to think about research methodology, how to formulate a research proposal and the applications of your research to the real world. The module will culminate in a day-long research event where you will be able to present your research to a group of your peers, academic staff and external stakeholders.

 

English Literature

Teaching English Literature (20 credits)

Using what you have learned on your degree, you will apply your skills in the Literature classroom, giving you a firm foundation from which to contemplate a teaching qualification, or simply the skills to start your own private teaching practice.

Modernism (20 credits)

This module explores the formal, conceptual and ideological complexities of the modernist period and addresses themes such as the decentred self, the city, the role of tradition, the relationship between gender and writing, the use of myth, and the interaction of national identity and cosmopolitanism.

Postmodernism (20 credits)

This module explores recent and contemporary texts in relation to critical issues such as authorship, narrative structure, linear progression, and identity. Selected texts will include novels, films and short stories.  

Visual Text (20 credits)

All text is visual but both readers and critics often have difficulty sustaining their awareness of its dual nature. You are encouraged throughout to think in terms of close textual analysis and the creative decisions behind a wide variety of different types of texts.

Alternative Ulster (20 credits)

This module will discuss literature written during the period known as the Northern Irish ‘troubles’, the Peace Process and after. It will consider poetry, prose, drama and film produced in this period, as well as other visual sources (mural, video and performance art) to consider a variety of ways of representing the conflict.

British Theatre Post-1950 (20 credits)

This module contextualises post-war British theatre in terms of naturalism, the avant-garde and the epic mode. A range of play texts will be explored in relation to form, narrative, action and character while exploring the ways in which they engage with issues of class, sexuality, gender and national identity.

Shakespeare and the Play of Thought (20 credits)

This module explores the various ways in which cultural intertextuality informs and shapes Shakespeare's approach to character and action. To gain a broader understanding of how Shakespearean drama can be seen as 'the play of thought,' we will analyse Shakespeare's work in terms of literary theories including new historicism, cognitive linguistics, and gender studies.

Post/Colonial African Literature (20 credits)

This module will invite students to undertake postcolonial analyses of African literature in a variety of forms, including poetry, novels and graphic narratives, by writers from South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Rwanda, Ghana and elsewhere. Key topics will include: colonial cultures and resistance, postcolonial trauma, African feminism, national allegories and national consciousness, postcolonial ecocriticism, the African diaspora and migration, and Africa and globalisation.

Rebels, Villains and Discontented Minds (20 credits)

The subject of this module is ‘disobedience’: how it was defined, represented, condemned and, on occasions, celebrated in the 16th and 17th century English literature.

Dissertation (20 credits)

The Dissertation is a key feature of the course and provides you with an opportunity to undertake an independent and challenging research project under the guidance of a member of academic staff. Your research topic is defined in second year and in third year you focus on analysis and interpretation in preparation for the written submission.

 

Creative Writing

Teaching Creative Writing (20 credits)

Using what you have learned on your degree, you will apply your skills in the Creative Writing classroom, giving you a firm foundation from which to contemplate a teaching qualification, or simply the skills to start your own private teaching practice.

Biography: Tradition and Innovation (20 credits)

This module puts theory into practice as we examine the literary history of biography, consider the issues and tensions raised by the post-modern context, and explore them in our own biographical writing.

Scriptwriting for TV and Film (20 credits)

Through a professionally geared script development programme, you will create first a premise, then treatment, step outline and first draft for a complete screenplay of at least fifty minutes. In seminars you will discuss ideas for story, character and theme within the group. Treatments, step outlines and the first draft are developed in one-to-one tutorials.

New Departures: Reading and Writing Innovative Poetry (20 credits)

This module combines critical and creative study of some of the most exciting poetry written in the last fifty years. We begin with definitions of the aesthetic approach and critical stance of innovative poetries produced on both sides of the Atlantic since 1950. 

Writing for Performance (20 credits)

This module offers you the chance to explore the theory and practice of writing for performance beyond traditional playwriting, covering concept, story, structure, characterisation, dialogue, theatricality, rewriting and revising.

 

Drama

Teaching Drama (20 credits)

Using what you have learned on your degree, you will apply your skills in the Drama classroom, giving you a firm foundation from which to contemplate a teaching qualification, or simply the skills to start your own private teaching practice.

New Trends in Theatre and Performance (20 credits)

In this core module you will explore the development of post-dramatic theatre forms and examine the work of a number of contemporary practitioners in order to develop an understanding of key aspects of 21st century performance making. Key topics that may be included are: the performer/persona/audience relationship; liveness and intermediality; non- hierarchy; simultaneity and the density of signs; the intertextual script; performance as event; liminal space and experience.

The Method: A Strasbergian Approach (20 credits)

This module is a practical performance module that aims to develop the students’ basic naturalistic acting skill via the tools of “The Method”. The students will explore and perform scenes from canonical American plays. This module is also recommended for students studying dramatic writing as the plays studied offer a world class example of detailed characterisation, plot and dialogue. As the main aim of the playwright and script writer is to be concerned with performability, gaining knowledge into the art of the actor can be of great benefit in the writing process.

British Theatre Post-1950 (20 credits)

This module contextualises post-war British theatre in terms of naturalism, the avant-garde and the epic mode. A range of play texts will be explored in relation to form, narrative, action and character while exploring the ways in which they engage with issues of class, sexuality, gender and national identity.

Writing for Performance (20 credits)

This module offers you the chance to explore the theory and practice of writing for performance beyond traditional playwriting, covering concept, story, structure, characterisation, dialogue, theatricality, rewriting and revising.

Shakespeare and the Play of Thought (20 credits)

This module explores the various ways in which cultural intertextuality informs and shapes Shakespeare's approach to character and action. To gain a broader understanding of how Shakespearean drama can be seen as 'the play of thought,' we will analyse Shakespeare's work in terms of literary theories including new historicism, cognitive linguistics, and gender studies.

Renaissance Theatre Acting (20 credits)

You will work with a range of texts, including Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Restoration works. In practical workshops you are encouraged to experiment with rhythm and language, and to apply characterisation and physicalisation techniques within the context of both naturalistic and non-naturalistic performance styles.

Theatre Directing (20 credits)

This module begins with series of classes exploring the role of the director in relation to a range of contemporary and historical scripts. Under close tutor guidance, you will then consider and apply appropriate theatrical methodologies in order to develop your own directorial approach. All students will be given the opportunity to lead small group work in terms of exploring and experimenting with a range of directorial approaches to both script and to performers.

 

Other

University Wide Language Programme (20 credits)

This module provides the opportunity to learn or develop a language with the University-wide language programme.

FAQs

What's the English and creative writing scene like in Greater Manchester?

We're proud that Greater Manchester's English and creative writing sector is etched on the world map. Greater Manchester has produced iconic writers such as Thomas De Quincey, Howard Jacobson, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Burgess, Jeanette Winterson and Lemn Sissay. There is a thriving creative writing scene here covering all kinds of genres, and regular literary festivals and events that are a great source of inspiration and ambition for our students. 

Do you have any social channels I can follow you on?

The English department have a Instagram, Twitter and Facebook account you can follow so you can see the great things our staff get up to. 

How can I best prepare for my studies at the University of Salford?

If you're taking one of our degrees with Creative Writing in the title, our tutor David Savill (a famous published novelist) recommends that you keep working on your writing, so you have a readymade store of work to draw on in your first year workshops.

If you're taking a degree with drama in the title, Szilvi Naray-Davey (actress, translator and programme leader for Drama) recommends that you try your best to take in as many plays as you can, whether in person or online.

If you're taking a degree with Literature in the title, you should focus on the writing that makes you happy - there is space for a personal, focused project in the final year dissertation.

If you're taking a degree with Language in the title, listen for the language all around you - whether that's children in your family learning their first words or different accents you encounter. Start noticing language in the world and note down anything you find interesting so your expert tutors can explain it.

What career pathways have Salford graduates followed?

You may be asking 'what can you do with an English degree?' Our students go into so many wonderful careers: writing, public relations, teaching, journalism, academia. The exciting thing about English is that it gives you the skills for the jobs of the future. Your communication skills will set you up to be a flexible, independent thinker who can deal with the changing nature of work in the twenty-first century. We also offer an internship at a publishing house as well as other opportunities.

You can find more details of these opportunities here.

How are students supported as they progress from college level study to university level?

We offer a free writing course to all of our students called Wordscope, which focuses on helping you to develop your writing skills, easing the transition from college to university. By participating in this course, you can learn to tackle common writing problems such as punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraphing.

For more information, you can take a look at the Wordscope webpage.

When can we expect our timetables?

Personalised timetables are sent to students when they register in September. We try our best to keep your timetable sensible and avoid you being in every day of the week. There are no lectures on a Wednesday afternoon then so that students can participate in clubs, societies and extracurricular activities.

You will have nine in-class hours a week, which will be a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops - alongside drop-in office hours and personal tutor meetings.

WHAT NEXT?

Go back to the course page for more information on the degree: BA (Hons) English Multidiscipline

Or, if you're ready to apply, click here and don't forget your UCAS information: 

How to apply

UCAS code Q307

Institution code S03

HAVE ANY QUESTIONS?

We're always here to help support you and answer any queries you may have about an English degree. Get in touch with our friendly team by emailing enquiries@salford.ac.uk or phoning +44 (0)161 295 4545.