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Law with Criminology

LLB (Hons)

School - Salford Business School

Subject area - Law

UCAS Code: M1M9 (8L41 with professional placement)

Start Date(s): September

Duration:

LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology (three years full-time)

LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology with Professional Placement Year (four years full-time)

Fees:

UK - £9,250 per year

International - £13,320 per year

In Brief:

  • 94% of students say that staff on Salford Law programmes are good at explaining things [source: NSS 2018 - University of Salford analysis of unpublished NSS data]
  • Gain a qualifying law degree, accredited by the Bar Standards Board and the Solicitors Regulation Authority, with highly transferable skills
  • Enhance your employability with a year-long professional placement with a law firm; during this year, you will not pay University fees and you will earn a salary for your work
  • Benefit from strong industry links to help develop your skills in real-world situations
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

Course Summary

Designed to allow you to gain a qualifying law degree, as well as to explore crime and justice from a sociological perspective, Law with Criminology is a programme for people who wish to embark on a career in law and lift the lid on some of the most important and contentious issues facing society.

An industry-focus is placed at the heart of every programme delivered at Salford Business School. From initiatives like the CLOCK Scheme, that allow you to practice your legal knowledge by supporting vulnerable members of the community, to guest speakers and placement opportunities, Law with Criminology helps you to improve your practical skills as well as your academic knowledge.

Law with Criminology equips you with the tools you need for a successful career in the legal sector and an advanced knowledge of criminology. The programme is accredited by the Bar Standards Board and the Solicitors Regulation Authority. This means your studies will satisfy the requirements of the legal professional bodies for the award of a qualifying law degree with nine generic core law modules and one other specialist law module.

This degree is also offered with a Foundation Year, visit www.salford.ac.uk/ug-courses/business-foundation-year for details.

There was a really warm and friendly feel about the University.  The staff in the School have been so supportive and I cannot thank them enough. It’s not just chalk and talk at Salford. We can participate in the lectures and engage with the topics.

As well as placements in Law firms and taking part in the CLOCK initiative, we were given valuable opportunities to sit in chambers and put our questions to two judges.  Salford really does fully prepare you for the working world ensuring you have the opportunity to gain as much industry experience as possible.

Kirsty Ann Mayle, LLB Law
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-faOWDOxuDs

Awards and Accreditation

Course Details

Like all programmes at Salford Business School, the modules delivered on the Accounting and Finance syllabus are designed around the current needs of employers and professional accounting bodies. With the opportunity for all students to complete a paid work placement between their second and third years, you will enter the world of work with an in-depth knowledge of the industry and of key business concepts.

The foundation of knowledge you build in your first year of study will be developed upon throughout the remainder of the course. With optional modules that allow you to specialise, Sage training, professional mentoring and the use of facilities such as our Bloomberg suite, Accounting and Finance at Salford Business School meets the needs of both employers seeking high-calibre candidates and graduates aspiring to rewarding careers.

Accounting and Finance students develop skills that are useful in the fast-paced world of finance and beyond. The programme prepares graduates for careers as chartered accountants, management accountants, business advisers and tax specialists.

YEAR 1                            

This module gives you a practical introduction to the sources of law, court structures and court systems, as well as many of the basic concepts studied later in the course. You will develop key skills in interpreting the law and undertaking legal research.                              
You will examine punishment by the state of offenders and the general principles of criminal liability, along with an examination of principal offences and defences.                              
This module provides an introduction to the key foundational issues, ideas, and ways of thinking within criminology.                              
You will explore the rules that govern legally binding agreements between parties, and the importance of informed negotiation skills in making contracts.                              
This module allows you to review the law relating to civil wrongs, such as negligence, and when and how compensation can be claimed if one person negligently causes harm to another.                              
You will be introduced to the form, key features and purpose of the institutions of the contemporary criminal justice system in England and Wales and begin an exploration of the issues relating to justice and civil liberties.                              

YEAR 2                            

This module explores the rights and obligations of the citizen and the state, judicial review of administrative action, and the constitution of the UK.                              
This module examines a range of theories of crime and criminal justice and the questions which produce those theories.                              
This module gives you a general introduction to European Union Law, dealing with the structures and institutions of the EU, the obligations imposed upon the EU Member States, and the rights conferred upon EU citizens.                                        
You will consider the legal nature of ownership and possession of land, the classification of property in English law, and how interests in land are created and transferred.                                                      

Optional Modules                            

You will look at the history, context and implications of media law and regulation and consider some of the legal moral, social and political debates which exist in this area of law.  Issues such as the freedom of the press, reporting restrictions and pre-trial publicity will be examined as        well        as defamation, privacy and harassment.                                          
You will learn about the role of law across international boundaries by considering the rules of public and private international law. This module puts these rules into a context of international trade law and intellectual property law.                                                                    
The law of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) now permeates all branches of the law and affects an increasing number of legal relations. The Human Rights Law module focuses on understanding the scope of protection afforded by the ECHR, especially in the light of its integration in the UK with the Human Rights Act 1998.
You will gain an understanding of the construction of deviant labels based on variables of ethnicity, gender and youth, and the relationship between these labels and crime. You will engage with issues surrounding experiences of crime and encounters with the criminal justice system. You will also compare crime policies on a national and international scale and look at a number of historical and contemporary case-studies.
You will develop an understanding of how and why people become victims and of the relationship between victimisation and social and cultural variables. You will critically explore the place of the victim in the criminal justice system, and how they are processed.
This module offers a broad introduction to the gendered dimensions of crime/criminality, criminal victimisation, criminal justice, and penology, and of the gendered theorising which attempts to account for this. It looks at the significance of gender to our understandings of and responses to crime and deviant behaviour.
You will gain an overview of the philosophy, nature, significance, outcomes and consequences of the criminal justice process and explore how it functions. You will think critically about key aspects of the criminal justice process and examine the interaction between different actors and agencies involved, and between the criminal justice process and politics, the community and the media.
You will gain an understanding of rehabilitation and personal change, developing a critical appreciation of how dominant theoretical approaches underpin professional practice in criminal justice. You will consider the development of probation services and related interventions (including substance misuse) in their historical, cultural, political and conceptual contexts and develop an understanding of the relationship between rehabilitation and diversity. You will be encouraged to take a critical, reflexive approach and consider the purposes and challenges of delivering rehabilitation in the penal system,    substance misuse services and related industry.

YEAR 3

This encompasses the study of trusts and their uses, looking at both structures and remedies where traditional contractual and tortious rules have proved inadequate
This module involves a critical analysis of the criminal justice system and the major stages of the pre-trial and trial process.

Optional Modules

This module covers the law relating to the formation, financing and management of companies, and related corporate activity.                  
Designed to enable students to acquire a sound knowledge of the role played by negotiation within legal practice, the Client Care module is a unique and highly practical offering at UG level. Throughout the module students will develop and strengthen their capability to demonstrate good practice in legal writing, as well as a real appreciation of professional conduct issues arising in modern UK practice. The aim of the module is to enable all student to build skills and real awareness of the importance of client care within legal practice giving them a real competitive edge in any legal and customer-facing roles.  
This module builds upon the study of the general law of contract, covering specific contracts in both a commercial and consumer context, such as sales and supply of goods, credit agreements and insurance.                                          
Competition Law introduces you to the approach to competition law and policy taken at the EU and UK levels. The module will enable you to critically analyse and discuss contemporary issues of competition law and policy.
In this module, you will critically explore the issues associated with industrial law connected to employers’ duties and employees’ rights. You will examine the application of legal principles related to industrial relations, trade union law, industrial action and health and safety law.      
You will gain an understanding of the construction of deviant labels based on variables of ethnicity, gender and youth, and the relationship between these labels and crime. You will engage with issues surrounding experiences of crime and encounters with the criminal justice system. You will also compare crime policies on a national and international scale and look at a number of historical and contemporary case-studies.
You will develop an understanding of how and why people become victims and of the relationship between victimisation and social and cultural variables. You will critically explore the place of the victim in the criminal justice system, and how they are processed.
This module offers a broad introduction to the gendered dimensions of crime/criminality, criminal victimisation, criminal justice, and penology, and of the gendered theorising which attempts to account for this. It looks at the significance of gender to our understandings of and responses to crime and deviant behaviour.
You will gain an overview of the philosophy, nature, significance, outcomes and consequences of the criminal justice process and explore how it functions. You will think critically about key aspects of the criminal justice process and examine the interaction between different actors and agencies involved, and between the criminal justice process and politics, the community and the media.
You will gain an understanding of rehabilitation and personal change, developing a critical appreciation of how dominant theoretical approaches underpin professional practice in criminal justice. You will consider the development of probation services and related interventions (including substance misuse) in their historical, cultural, political and conceptual contexts and develop an understanding of the relationship between rehabilitation and diversity. You will be encouraged to take a critical, reflexive approach and consider the purposes and challenges of delivering rehabilitation in the penal system,    substance misuse services and related industry.  
You will consider the strategies used to construct guilt and innocence in a courtroom situation, paying particular attention to their sociological underpinnings. Case studies will be an important part of the module's content, and there will be presentations by prosecutorial, defence and judicial professionals.        There will also be an opportunity to stage some mock trials in a local courtroom.                              
You will be introduced to issues surrounding the policing and social control in the past, in contemporary society and in the future, and analyse how social control and surveillance are manifested. You will identify the implications for policing and social control studies on wider sociology as well as policy and practice.                              
You will develop an understanding of the evolution of the modern prison and of the relationship between prisons, probation, the courts and the media and the economic and social environment in which they operate. You will gain an understanding of the impacts of punishment with regard to age, gender and ethnicity and consider criminal justice institutions, policies, and practices in their contexts.                              
An overview of the conceptualisation of "violence". You will examine debates concerning violence in various aspects of life, consider the contemporary debates surrounding violence in a range of contexts, trace the development of theorisations of violence and consider ethical, methodological and practical issues involved in the researching of violence.      
This module addresses the complex and often paradoxical relationships between human rights, extreme human rights abuses, particularly genocide, and resistance to such abuses. Its distinctiveness lies in providing students with interdisciplinary, theoretically informed and case studies grounded approaches to human rights, genocide and resistance. Its two main aims are: (i) To familiarise students with specific examples of extreme human rights violations and cases of genocide, and to provide the conceptual and analytical tools to critically examine state and non-state social, economic and political structures  in  relation to the extent to which they may be conducive to human rights abuses and genocide; and, (ii) To study actual practices of resistance to genocide, extreme violence and human rights abuse, including human rights activism and advocacy, and the relations such practices of resistance have with  the        human rights international and national frameworks and practices.

Please note that it may not be possible to deliver the full list of options every year as this will depend on factors such as how many students choose a particular option. Exact modules may also vary in order to keep content current. When accepting your offer of a place to study on this programme, you should be aware that not all optional modules will be running each year. Your tutor will be able to advise you as to the available options on or before the start of the programme. Whilst the University tries to ensure that you are able to undertake your preferred options, it cannot guarantee this.

Entry Requirements

Qualification Entry requirements
GCSE
You must fulfil our GCSE entry requirements as well as one of the requirements listed below.
Maths and English at grade C or grade 4
UCAS tariff points LLB: 112-120 points
With Professional Placement: 120-128 points
GCE A level BBC-BBB with a minimum of two A2 passes. With professional experience year: BBB-ABB with a minimum of two A2 passes
BTEC National Diploma DMM for the three year programme
DDM with Professional Experience Year
International Baccalaureate Indicatively 31 points for International Baccalaureate Diploma (32 points with experience year)

Salford Alternative Entry Scheme (SAES)

We welcome applications from students who may not meet the stated entry criteria but who can demonstrate their ability to pursue the course successfully. Once we have received your application we will assess it and recommend it for SAES if you are an eligible candidate.

There are two different routes through the Salford Alternative Entry Scheme and applicants will be directed to the one appropriate for their course. Assessment will either be through a review of prior learning or through a formal test.

English Language Requirements

For admission to programmes of study at the University an applicant for whom English is not a first language must possess a current qualification deemed acceptable by the University as evidence of proficiency in the English Language. For entry to level 4, 5, 6 such a qualification must equate to a minimum average score of 6 or above (and for each component 5.5 or above) from the Cambridge/British Council English Language Testing Service (IELTS) or alternative examinations as recognised by the University.

Applicant profile

If you are looking to study any Law degree, you need to be prepared to work consistently to meet the standards and deadlines required by the academic and professional strands of a qualifying law degree.

Law with Criminology involves a high level of self-directed study and research outside of the classroom. You will be required to read each week, and digest and critically analyse complex source materials.

You will also be required to critically evaluate source materials and the academic arguments of others to help construct your own logical, ethical and well-resourced arguments.

Applicants will be expected to be up-to-date with news and enjoy reading, debating and developing their own arguments.

But, as well as this hard work and dedication, you will meet great people like yourself, have access to a wide range of learning activities and open the doors to an exciting and rewarding career.

Fees and Funding

Fees

Fees 2018-19

Type of Study Fee
Full-time £9,250 per year
Part-time Your annual fee will be calculated pro rata to the full-time fee according to the number of credits you are studying.
Full-time International £13,320 per year

Additional Costs

You should also consider further costs which may include books, stationery, printing, binding and general subsistence on trips and visits.

Teaching

https://vimeo.com/236087711

Our staff are legal experts who have experience of working in the real- world as well as academia, so our teaching is strongly industry-focussed and industry-informed. You will benefit from a wide range of teaching methods which keep your studies interesting. Lectures, seminars, practical workshops, mooting exercises and case study classes are used across our modules and ensure variety in your learning experience. This is further enhanced by our Virtual Learning Environment and the use of podcasts, blogs, discussion boards and electronic voting systems, which making classes highly interactive.

Settling in

Every first year Law student has a peer mentor, a student in their 2nd or 3rd year of Law who remembers what it was like to be a new student and will help you with settling in.

You will also have a personal tutor and support from the progression team who can answer your questions, point you in the right direction or help with any problems.

Outside the classroom

There is a dynamic Law Society (run by students on the Law programmes) which organises extra-curricular activities – including Mooting, law debates and trips - as well as social events and competitions that will enhance your student experience and help you make new friends and connections. 

Mooting is the oral presentation of a legal case against an opposing counsel (or in my case, peer student), and before a judge. It’s the closest experience that a student can have whilst at university to appearing in court.”  Charles Buckman, winner, Salford Business School mooting competition 2018 (studying BSc Law: Media and Digital Industries)

Read about Charles’ experience at the MOOT final and his studies at Salford

Study Abroad

Through the Study Abroad programme, you could choose to spend a semester or a full year studying on an international exchange with one of our global partner institutions in Europe, the US or the rest of the world. We provide you with extensive support through workshops, personal guidance, tests and interview practice to help this opportunity become a reality.  

Graduates with international experience are increasingly sought by employers because they gain highly valuable skillsets living and studying in a different country.  

Wherever you go in the world, you pay your normal fees to University of Salford (which are often lower than the fees of the University you are studying at).  There are grants available to help with travel costs. 

Don’t be afraid to experience something new, because this is what gives our lives meaning. Go, travel and explore.” Maria Varsanova, LLB Law. Read about Maria's experience studying in Madrid as part of her Salford Law degree.

Assessment

Over the duration of your course a range of assessment techniques will be used. Types of assessment include; essays, assignments, exams, multiple choice tests, online tests, group reports, and portfolio work. The weighting between exams and coursework varies between modules and years, but exams still play a major role.

Employability

As part of the CLOCK scheme, you go to court with people who haven’t got representation to assist them with court paperwork and how the court works.  It’s quite a rewarding scheme because you actually get to see how law in action actually works.

Jake Ellison, LLB Law

Studying Law with Criminology opens up opportunities in a wide variety of career paths both within and outside the legal profession.  Because of their rigorous intellectual training and highly developed skills in research, analysis and communication, law graduates are in high-demand by employers.

Because of their rigorous intellectual training and highly developed skills in research, analysis and communication, law graduates are in high demand by employers. Irwin Mitchell Solicitors, Keoghs, Reeds Solicitors, Simpson Millar and Slater and Gordon are just a few of the organisations our LLB graduates have joined after graduating.

Career Prospects

Combining a rigorous academic curriculum and the development of essential professional skills, Law and Criminology produces graduates who are well placed to embark on careers both inside and outside of the legal sector.

Links with Industry

We have strong relationships with legal firms which opens up excellent opportunities for you to learn from and network with solicitors and barristers:  

  • All Law students have the opportunity of a week-long mini-pupillage shadowing a barrister at Kenworthy’s Chambers in Salford
  • Students can apply to the CLOCK scheme through which you can practise what you’ve learned by offering legal support and advice to people who otherwise might have none
  • There is an exciting series of guest lectures and industry visits when you can network with Law professionals. Recent speakers have included Wilf White, Head of communications at the Bar Standards Board; and lawyers from DWF LLP

Placement Opportunities

You can enhance your career options with a year-long work placement as a paralegal assistant with a law firm, giving you the opportunity to apply the skills, knowledge and understanding you have gained in the first two years of the course.  Taking a placement between your second and final year helps to further develop your management skills and enhances your CV and employment prospects. A placement also provides a real context for the subjects studied on the course and helps in the preparation for your final year.

You will work with an employer which could be a local, national or international organisation.  Our students have worked in a wide variety of organisations; some legal, some commercial – in 2016-17, these included, Shoosmiths LLP and the NHS.  You will arrange your work placement with support from the School’s dedicated Employability Hub and from your industrial placements tutor both before and during your placement.  The placement year gives you an additional 60 credits towards your final results.

During this year, you will not pay fees to the University and will earn a wage for the work that you do.

There are different entry requirements and course codes for the Professional Experience Year option.

Further Study

Facilities

Salford Business School is located at the heart of the University’s Peel campus in the newly refurbished Lady Hale Building, and the Chapman Building, offering state-of-the-art facilities for the Business School’s student learning community and just minutes from Manchester city centre. Chapman is a stylish modern space with six lecture theatres equipped with the very latest technology and large screen displays, a series of communal learning and breakout spaces, plus a Fairtrade café with panoramic views across the campus.

Lady Hale is the home to all dedicated business school student support including the school office, an employability hub, a base for the Business School society, and several open study spaces.

All University of Salford students also have access to the MediaCityUK campus including its study facilities.  MediaCityUK is home to major BBC and ITV departments and over 80 businesses across the creative and digital sectors.  It is recognised as one of the most innovative developments in Britain and is a vibrant place in which to live, work, socialise and study.

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