User Led Partnerships

Dementia Hub Music Cafe

Much of what the Institute does is aimed at improving the lives of people with dementia and their care-givers. Co-production underpins our activities and we are lucky to have the input of a range of stakeholders to guide our work. 

These include our Dementia Associates Panel, a group of people with direct experience of living with, or supporting someone who is living with, dementia.  The Associates provide input to research project design and work alongside Institute’s leadership team to identify priorities for conferences and events. We have won international awards for the ways in which we have worked alongside people living with dementia in our research.

We also run groups in our new Dementia Hub designed to promote the involvement of people with dementia and other local stakeholders. SID’s café, a music group and a ‘Good Life’ club which is hosted in our dementia friendly designed garden at the Hub, are all examples of how we involve people with dementia regularly in activities designed to promote well-being and inclusion. We also undertake research with less-heard and marginalised communities locally, regionally and nationally.  

Examples of recent projects include:

  • The Somali Dementia Aware Project which seeks to promote awareness of dementia among the Somali community in North London with a view to health promotion and prevention.
  • Improving Access to Dementia Services in Salford: this project aimed to increase take-up of health and social care services, promote awareness of dementia among Salford’s diverse communities, and raise awareness of the needs of diverse communities among health and social care providers.
  • Developing Outcome Measures to Evidence and Embed Good Practice in Belong: this knowledge exchange partnership seeks to identify quality of life indicators in Belong (an older people’s care provider and develop and embed outcome measures to evidence these.
  • Examining Interactions between Staff and Residents in Care Homes: this project seeks to identify interactions and behaviours which have a positive impact on well-being and inform future training and best practice)
  • Empowered conversations, a project which aims to promote the inclusion and involvement of people living with dementia.

This cross-cutting area is lead by Professor Anthea Innes

Partnerships

From Mediated Clowning to Telematics Entertainment for Dementia Care: Investigation by Practice as Research

Project title

Modelling Interactive Clown Practices for Virtual Game Design applications in Dementia Care

Theme

Creativity and UIaSI

Digital Media, Health and Wellbeing

Public engagement through Clowning and Popular Performance Practice

Funder and amount

  • British Academy/Leverhulme Trust: Modelling Interactive Clown Practices for Virtual Game Design applications in Dementia care. (£ 9,600)
  • School of Arts & Media Impact Fund (£620)

Start and end dates

  • Start date: June 2016
  • End date: March 2018

Project lead name and email contact

Project team names and institutional affiliation

  • Dr Richard Talbot, Senior Lecturer in Performance, School of Arts & Media, University of Salford
  • Dr Claire Dormann, specialist in Digital Media and Humour, University of Liverpool (formerly with Salford Institute of Dementia)

150 word abstract summarising project

Assistive technologies supplement declining physical and cognitive abilities and assist people living with dementia in performing their daily activities, and with monitoring health and safety. To complement these approaches, we are investigating online performance applications that enhance well being,provide social interaction and stimulate joy and laughter. We use clown performances as a starting point for our investigation and are finding new approaches to clowning as a form in this environment. Clown interventions have long been adapted within the health care context. Thus we are exploring Telly Clown practices, telematic clown, clown on Skype, for the benefits of people living with dementia, families and caregivers, including grandchildren.

Following research that has demonstrated a link between performance interventions and alleviating anxiety for people living with dementia and their carers, we are conducting these practical experiments and aim for these applications to be used at homes, in community centres or care homes rather than hospitals.

We are conducting four short laboratory experiments to test prototype interactive performances with groups of people living with dementia. We have promoted the project at the SiFD Dementia Cafe, Humphrey Booth Resource Centre Swinton and amongst Salford student nurses and Dementia Associates. We will be presenting a paper at the Theatre & Performance Research Association conference in September 2017.

Conference presentations

Forthcoming:

  • Spot the Difference - Post the Sameness: Experiments in Virtual Clowning.
    Richard Talbot, School of Arts & Media, University of Salford, Theatre and Performance Research Association Conference, Salford, 1st September 2017
  • Workshop and Paper – ‘Falling and Tumbling Online: Clown Interactions and Tele-Health Care’ at CIRCUS SYMPOSIUM:
    PHILIP ASTLEY AND THE LEGACY OF MODERN CIRCUS, Manchester Metropolitan University 26 & 27 September 2017

Other dissemination activities

Presentations:

  • Nursing Society Dementia Awareness Conference 17th July 2017
  • Humphrey Booth Resource Centre and Poppy Day Care Centre Dementia Awareness Day 19th May 2017

Website links (if applicable)

Blog (work in progress)

Additional project videos on Vimeo

 

 

Richard Talbot/Kurt Zarniko and Veteran Clown Performer, Leo Nolan Evans ‘Silly Old-Me’
© Richard Talbot

Dementia Hub Clowning
Dementia hub clowning

Dementia and Diversity

Project title

Dementia and Diversity

Theme

User Involvement and Service Improvement

Funder and amount

  • Telephone funding (internal university funding) £2,500 (finished)
  • Camden LBC £8,700 (report not signed off yet)
  • Salford CCG £19,200 (finished)

Start and end dates

  • Start date: multiple
  • End date: ongoing

Project lead name and email contact

Anya Ahmed

Email dementia@salford.ac.uk 

Project team names and institutional affiliation

School of Health & Society

150 word abstract summarising project

Salford BME dementia study

Project aims and objectives

The aims of the study were: to improve access to dementia services for Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in Salford, increase carer identification and registration, and raise awareness of the needs of Salford’s diverse communities; and to increase staff knowledge/develop evidence-based decision-making relating to minority communities who may access dementia services/general health and social care related services in Salford.

The aims were met by addressing the following objectives:

  1. Mapping existing service provision in Salford.
  2. Gathering the views of service   providers and community members.
  3. The identification of barriers and facilitators to minority communities accessing existing dementia services/general health and social care related services in Salford.
  4. Identification of the aspirations of minority communities for future dementia services/general health and social care related services in Salford.
  5. The establishment of staff (service provider) knowledge and understanding of the needs of minority communities who may access dementia services/general health and social care related services in Salford.

Somali Dementia Aware Study

There remains very little knowledge and research on BME communities and dementia, and it has been suggested that there is a need to gather more information and engage further with BME communities in order to fill gaps in knowledge about their service needs (Botsford and Harrison Dening, 2015) to successfully implement the National Dementia Strategy. This research, commissioned by the Somali Cultural Centre in Kilburn and partnered by the University of Salford, was funded by an Innovation Grant from Camden Borough Council.

 

The aims of the study were fourfold:

  1. First, to fill gaps in   knowledge about the Somali community’s experiences of dementia;
  2. Second to gather information   about service needs and issues relating to access;
  3. Third, to gain an   understanding of the levels of awareness of the needs of Somalis among service providers;
  4. Fourth to make recommendations for policy and practice and to raise awareness of dementia among Camden’s Somali community.

Fragmented Pathway

I wanted to write this account because of my personal experiences as a care giver for my mother. My mother lived with us and was eventually diagnosed with vascular dementia. I emphasise eventually, because getting the diagnosis was not as straight forward as it should have been or as we expected. There were many barriers and obstacles that we as a family had to encounter throughout the journey and the delay in getting the diagnosis had many consequences.

I suppose the first time I publicly talked about my experience as care giver was in 2013. After I had spoken a lady approached  me and said that it must have been really hard for me to talk about my mum. It was because it was so personal and wasn’t anybody else’s story – it was simply our life that we were living on a day to day basis.

Some people from the south Asian community may not be able to talk about dementia and their loved one who is living with it but I think it is really important for me to share my experiences because mental health conditions and dementia are still sadly a taboo subject with stigma attached, particularly in my own local community.

Until 2012 I had worked in the public sector for over 23 years and in 2012 my mother’s mental and physical health began to deteriorate which led me to take early retirement and I gave up full-time employment to become a full-time care giver.

After a period of time and whilst I was still sharing my caring responsibilities with my wife – who was my rock throughout - I felt it important to set about on a campaign to engage with the south Asian community and healthcare professionals to start a process of raising awareness of dementia, carer givers and End of Life Care. This was to ensure that other families would be better informed and aware of the challenges they faced and support available.

I also wanted to ensure that the Dementia Support Services, the Police, Health Commissioners and health care professionals were aware of the nuances that affect the south Asian and BME communities – i.e. one size does not fit all and the south Asian, BME community shouldn’t be treated as a homogeneous group and they are definitely not ‘hard to reach’, perhaps just easier to ignore.

Shahid Mohammed, April 2017

Publications

  1. Ahmed, A., Mohammed, S. (5%) and Egal,   U. (5%) ‘Dementia and diverse communities’ in Ahmed, A. & Rogers, R. [Eds] (2016) Working with   marginalised groups: from policy to practice London, Palgrave
  2. Ahmed, A., Wilding, M., Hawarth, R. &   McCaughan, S. (2017) Promoting diversity and inclusiveness in   dementia services in Salford, University of Salford, Salford CVS (impact – informed practice of   service providers in Salford and GM; recommendations incorporated into Joint   Health and Well-Being Needs Assessment)

Conference presentations

  1. Ahmed, A., Wilding,   M., Haworth-Lomax, R. & McCaughan, S. ‘Towards inclusiveness and   diversity in dementia services’ Social Policy Association   Conference, University of Durham, 10th – 12th July 2017
  2. Ahmed, A., Wilding, M., Haworth-Lomax, R. & McCaughan, S. Inclusiveness and   diversity in dementia services in Salford, Alzheimer’s Research UK public   engagement event, Salford. 17th May
  3. Ahmed, A. Inclusiveness and diversity in dementia services in   Salford (presented to Salford Dementia Action Alliance, 6th June 2017)
  4. Ahmed, A. & Wilding, M. Report launch Inclusiveness and diversity in   dementia services in Salford, University of Salford, 31st March 2017
  5. Ahmed, A. The significance of ethnicity and culture in dementia care for   British-Somalis in the UK: implications for policy and practice Alzheimer’s   Society Europe Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 2016
  6. Ahmed, A. Inclusiveness and diversity in dementia services   in Salford, Interim report presentation, Salford CVS, 22nd June   2016

Development of the Dementia Hub

Project title

Co-ordination and development of the Salford Institute of Dementia Hub

Theme

Environment; User Involvement and Service Improvement

Funder and amount

  • £66,000 from the Garfield Weston Foundation, £72,000 from the Wolfson Foundation
  • £7,000 from other individual donors
  • £124,000 commitment from the University.
  • The flooring was donated by Polyflor.

Start and end dates

April 2016 to May 2017

Project lead name and email contact

Project team names and institutional affiliation

  • Anthea Innes, School of Health and Society
  • Monika Sharma, School of the Built Environment

150 word abstract summarising project

  1. The first objective of the project was to create a home like environment to act as a demonstration and development space for the Institute, showcasing the best in dementia friendly design.
  2. The second objective was to create an accessible space for members of the local community to engage meaningfully with the Institute. This objective has also been successful and we have developed a programme of events and activities for members of the local community who may have been affected by dementia.
  3. One of the most important aspects of the project was the development of the dementia friendly garden quadrangle at the hub.
  4. The final objective for the hub was to create a collaborative working environment for academics, early career researchers, PhD students and visiting scholars.

Our objectives have been met in that we now have a space to demonstrate dementia friendly design principles and have hosted several 1-1 visits and two open days since the hub opened in May 2017 to September 2017 with more open days planned in the future. We have hosted a music performance by Music in Hospitals, a reading group by poet John Killick and our regular dementia café from May-Sept 2017 with our good life gardening group making fortnightly use of the dementia friendly garden.

We have hosted various meetings at the Hub, both internal research group meetings (e.g. our science group) international visitors (e.g. from Malaysia) with our early career researchers working in the hot desk space regularly.

Conference presentations

Sharma presented a poster (that won the best poster prize) in May 2017 at the University of Salford Health and Wellbeing ICZ event.

Other dissemination activities

Open days and visits to the hub.

Website links (if applicable)

Christopher Eccleston opens up about Dementia as new hub launches in Salford on YouTube.

The Malta Hospital Project

Project title

The Malta Hospital Project

Theme

  • Primary theme - Environment
  • Secondary theme - User Involvement and Service Improvement

Funder and amount

University of Malta: c. £2,000 year 1

Start and end dates

February 2017 to February 2020

Project lead name and email contact

Anthea Innes a.innes1@salford.ac.uk

Project team names and institutional affiliation

  • Anthea Innes, School of Health and Society, Salford Institute for Dementia
  • Charles Scerri, School of Pharmacology, University of Malta
  • Anthony Scerri, School of Nursing, University of Malta

150 word abstract summarising project

Although people with dementia occupy a quarter of hospital beds at any time the quality of care provided has been reported to be suboptimal and challenging. Moreover, they often stay longer in hospital during which their symptoms may deteriorate and are more likely to be discharged to a care home, thereby increasing the financial costs on the local health and social care services. As a result, the Maltese National Strategy for Dementia, recommends the need for workforce development across the health and social care services including the acute hospital. However, to date little is known about the learning needs of staff working in this sector in relation to dementia care. Consequently, the aim of the study will seek to address this, by analysing the learning needs of hospital staff and developing best practice guidelines in dementia care for acute hospitals.

Conference presentations

Scerri, A, Scerri C and Innes, A (2017) A systematic review of dementia training programmes in hospitals. Alzheimer Europe, Berlin Oct 17