Skip to main content

Building and architectural engineering

Reliable and fast methods of measuring sound insulation are vitally important for ensuring the quality of new buildings. However, the current measurement standards do not work well at low frequencies where most complaints occur. This doctoral research project will investigate novel measurement methods adapted for low frequencies that will complement existing standard methods. The research program will involve both theoretical and practical work and will draw on work carried out in numerous student projects. It will exploit the state-of-the-art laboratories at Salford and our 40 plus years of experience as an accredited laboratory for sound insulation measurement.

Contact a.t.moorhouse@salford.ac.uk

Diffusers are used to disperse sounds. In small rooms, such as studios, they smear early arriving reflections which otherwise could cause distortion. In larger spaces, such as auditoria, concert halls and theatres, they might be used to form stage or audience canopies to evenly distribute sound around the space. In the last few decades, many new types of diffusers have been developed, but still crucial aspects need researching. For instance, subjective testing is needed to evaluate the true perceptual worth of diffusers - such a phd could expand to develop binaural coloration measures which currently don't work well. Other doctorates could explore prediction and measurement methods for diffusers, for instance the former might research time domain methods while the latter might explore in-situ measurement techniques.

Contact t.j.cox@salford.ac.uk

Acoustic studies of ancient monuments is relatively scarce before the Greek and Roman eras when amphitheatres were central to these societies. Studies into the behaviour of sound in Neolithic archaeological sites show recurring and interesting acoustic effects, which would have been audible to our ancestors. Understanding the acoustics helps archaeologists and historians understand what the people using or constructing these places would have intended. This project intends to develop a methodology for a new area in archaeology and acoustics. The project involves the study of ancient sites around the world and includes measurements and modelling with room acoustic software, finite element analysis and wave based acoustic models.

Contact B.M.Fazenda@salford.ac.uk