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Research themes

Assessment of injury risk, assessment and management of injuries is led Dr Lee Herrington, with input from a range of other members of the team. This area of research has links with the Knee, Ankle and Foot research group led by Professor Richard Jones and Professor Chris Nester. The research focuses on the use of laboratory and field-based methods of assessment of injury risk (primarily knee, hamstring and tendon injuries), exercise-based interventions to reduce the risk of injury and the appropriate management and rehabilitation of injuries once they occur.

Determinants of change of direction performance is led by Dr Paul Jones with input from a range of other members of the team and overlaps with the ‘assessment of injury risk’ theme as many of the aforementioned injuries investigated occur during deceleration and change of direction tasks. The research focuses on identifying the primary kinetic and kinematic determinants of change of direction performance and the associated risk of injury, while identifying specific components that can be trained to enhance change of direction performance and reduce injury risk.

Lower limb muscle-tendon function during athletic tasks is led by Dr John McMahon with input from a range of other members of the team. The research focuses on quantifying lower limb muscle-tendon loading and interactions during various athletic tasks and the effects of task intensity on the lower limb muscle-tendon function. This research theme also explores associations between muscle architecture and athletic performance, in addition to the effect of training interventions on muscle architectural properties. The findings of this research has implications for training strategies used to enhance performance in specific athletic tasks and reduce injury risk.

Biomechanical assessment of strength, power and rehabilitation exercises is led by Dr Paul Comfort with input from a range of other members of the team. The research focuses on the comparison of commonly performed exercises to determine the ideal use of each exercise and their derivative exercise, including the effect of loading during such tasks (e.g. our research into the clean and its derivatives). In addition the research theme also investigates muscle activity and limb and joint loading during common ‘rehabilitation’ exercises to identify appropriate progressions and regressions for the rehabilitation of different injuries and therefore links with the ‘management of injuries’ theme led by Dr Lee Herrington.