Skip to main content

Current Studies

Research conducted in the Knee, Ankle and Foot research group aims to develop better understanding of the function of the knee, ankle and foot. We aim to understand how the function these structures change due to disease, injury and aging as well as developing and implementing effective therapies. 

We are currently recruiting for a number research studies. To find out more about these studies, please view the outlines below. If you are interesting in taking part in a research study or would like to find out more about the study, please click on the respective study links below.


1) MENI-FOOT Project: The effect of commercially available footwear interventions on biomechanical outcomes associated with knee osteoarthritis in meniscectomy patients

Overview

Individuals who sustain a meniscal injury are more likely to later develop osteoarthritis. Footwear interventions could provide conservative methods for alleviating loading around the knee during sport specific movement, which could delay or minimise the development of osteoarthritis in meniscal injury athletes. However, we do not know which footwear interventions will help reduce loading at the knee during sport-specific movements.

Objectives

We aim investigate knee joint loading during sport-specific movements to identify appropriate footwear interventions to alleviate knee joint loading.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.


2) BOOM StudyBiomechanical Outcomes associated with Osteoarthritis progression in Meniscectomy patients during athletic and functional tasks

Overview

Individuals who sustain a tear in the c-shaped disks in their knee, known as the meniscus, and need it to be repaired through surgery are more likely to later develop osteoarthritis. These disks are used for cushioning and support of your knee joint as it works as a buffer between your femur (thigh bone) and your tibia (shin bone). Understanding biomechanical changes from the injury, specifically during functional and sporting activities, will help develop future conservative approaches to delaying or minimising the development of OA.

Objectives

We aim investigate knee joint loading during sport-specific movements in individuals who sustained a meniscal injury and compare their movement and loading with healthy individuals.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.


3) In-Sleeve Study: Effects of lateral wedge insole and simple knee sleeve as single and combined treatments on biomechanical and clinical outcomes in individuals with knee osteoarthritis

Overview

Individuals who have knee osteoarthritis (OA) often complain of pain in knee and are at a high risk of a total knee replacement. Interventions such as insoles, knee sleeves or a combination of interventions could provide a conservative method for alleviating pain and loading at the knee which could delay or minimise the development of osteoarthritis and reduce the risk of requiring surgery. However, we currently do not know which interventions will help reduce loading and pain the most.

Objectives

We aim to determine whether a combined treatment has a superior effect over single treatment. Identifying the most effective treatment/ combination of treatments will allow the development of conservative methods for manage individuals with knee OA.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.


4) The influence of trunk inclination on lower limb moments and muscle activation

Overview

At the University of Salford, we are studying the biomechanics of walking in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and also in healthy volunteers. For our current project we are trying to understand how trunk inclination (forward lean of the upper body) affects the way in which the muscles in the legs work. We think increased trunk lean may be responsible for abnormal muscle patterns in people with knee OA.

For more information about participating in this study and to register your interest, click here.