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Doctoral students

Doctoral students

Natasha TylerNatasha Tyler ( Mellor)

e: n.mellor@edu.salford.ac.uk 

Professional Development of Healthcare Workers in International Placements: What is different?

I am currently a PhD student working on the MOVE Project. I have a background in psychology and an interest in measurement, global health, volunteering and education. I currently teach developmental, biological and cognitive psychology to level 4 and 5 students.  I have volunteered in developing countries in the past and am very interested in the dynamics between volunteer gain and gain for the developing country. I have also worked in many developed countries and am interested in what makes international placements different in terms of learning. I am interested to find out how this happens and which variables affect the likelihood of an educational outcome happening.  My PhD studies aim to discover the core outcomes (benefits and costs) of international placements for healthcare professional volunteers. I plan to develop a tool to measure these outcomes. I then intend to pilot on a variety of healthcare professionals.

So far I have completed a systematic review and metasynthesis to extract all of the professional and personal outcomes that are suggested in the literature. I have also completed a Delphi study to present these potential outcomes to stakeholders in the field in order to reduce these to a smaller list of benefits and costs that could be measured in a toolkit. 

Anita  De Klerk

e: A.Deklerk@edu.salford.ac.uk

England and Wales are currently experiencing a paradigm shift in the delivery of criminal justice and offender rehabilitation under the new Transforming Rehabilitation Agenda (TRA). A plethora of volunteer mentoring programmes have been developed by Third Sector Organisations, newly formed probation mutual’s and private companies allowing them to be able to bid and compete for prime and sub-prime contracts for the new regional Community Rehabilitation Centres (CRCs). However, all these volunteer programmes are underpinned by the hypothesis that mentoring does in fact reduce re-offending without sufficient evidence, practiced as a ‘theory incarnate’, and placing the unqualified, ‘well meaning’ volunteer of old at the heart of service delivery. My research centres around two fundamental questions; why do adults chose to give up their time to volunteer and more specifically why do they chose to volunteer to work with offenders and criminals? Further, my research aims to critically investigate the TRA and how much of it is based on the ‘new localism’ of the twenty first century, which has increased citizen participation within the criminal justice system through a moral economy, individual responsibilisation and the state’s manipulation of voluntarism to reduce state spending on, and minimise their responsibility for, offender rehabilitation in an abolitionist capacity as part of an ideological agenda. In addition, my research’s purpose is to investigate the volunteer’s response to the TRA and impact that the TRA has on the nature of voluntarism and, at an individual level, the nature of the volunteer.