Salford Institute for Dementia

Research theme: Technology

Title of research project/activity

Ludic Gerontechnology: Digital Games for Dementia Care

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Claire Dormann

Start date:July 2015

End date:July 2017

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Digital technology and in particular assistive technology for people living with dementia focuses mostly on health and safety issues rather that addressing leisure and entertainment needs. This led to an increased interest in digital games to support dementia care, with the development of cognitive rehabilitation and reminiscence games.

The aim of this project is to investigate the role of digital games in dementia care to facilitate and stimulate the design of digital games in this context including educational, therapeutical or entertainment games. Thus a literature review of games around dementia care was carried out. The review brought out a number of design issues and highlighted limitations of on-going development. We advocate stepping out of the functionalistic approach taken in this domain to design enjoyable, emotional and fun game experiences.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Toward ludic gerontechnology, a review of games for dementia care. Proceeding of First Joint International Conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) and the Foundations of Digital Games conferences (FDG), August 2016 (16p).

Workshop on Digital games and Aging (co-organiser), First Joint International Conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) and the Foundations of Digital Games conferences (FDG), August 2016

Poster: Ludic Gerontechnology and Dementia Care, Dementia Research Showcase,

January 2016

Presentation: Digital games and Dementia, Documenting and Memory: Art and Media Seminar, University of Salford

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

  • New Research Agenda in this context
  • Guidelines for  the design of digital games

Enhancing wellbeing of people living with dementia and their carers

Title of research project/activity

Characterising the sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transition in a free-living setting using body-worn monitoring (e.g. the activPAL activity monitor).

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Chris Pickford (Institute for Dementia, Salford University)

Malcolm Granat (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Andrew Kerr (University of Strathclyde)

Start date:July 2015

End date:ongoing

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

The way we physically move and interact with the environment holds key information

about our health, our routines and lifestyle. This free-living behaviour encompasses

physical movements that can be recorded using physical behaviour monitors. By

dissecting this information, we can determine when a person is sitting, standing, lying and

walking. Comparing activity day after day allows us to predict a person’s habits and allows

us to monitor how they change. Such changes can be indicative of progression to and within

dementia.

By characterising components of physical movement such as the transition from sitting to

standing and standing to sitting, analysis of physical deterioration or rehabilitation can be

monitored and appropriate timely interventions planned. In this project we are investigating:

  1. Can the sit-to-stand and stand-to sit transition be characterised robustly using activPAL activity monitor data?
  2. Can we identify differences between the way healthy people transition and the way people who have suffered a stroke transition?

3. What are the features of the transition that can be robustly identified and compared between individuals and populations?

Progress to date

Using data from stroke patients (~40, donated by Andrew Kerr) and healthy age matched patients (~25, donated by the Malcolm Granat) we have been able to show a difference in the peak velocity of transitions. We have addressed aims 1 and 2 which are currently being prepared for publication. The algorithm used to analyse the data will be used with data collected from people with dementia as part of a Peel Trust Fall Detection project (PI Malcolm Granat). This data will be collected from residents across the Four Seasons Healthcare network.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Publication in preparation

Poster presentation at the January 2016 Dementia Showcase event

Contact

Chris Pickford

Email c.g.pickford@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 3316

Malcolm Granat

Email m.h.granat@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 2568

Title of research project/activity

A novel body-worn falls detection system: development and evaluation in the frail elderly population

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Sathish Sankerpandi (School of Health Sciences, Salford University) Malcolm Granat (School of Health Sciences, Salford University) Chris Pickford (Institute for Dementia, Salford University)

Laurence Kenney (School of Health Sciences, Salford University) Sibylle Thies (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Tracey Williamson (School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences, Salford University)

Ian Smith (Four Seasons Health Care)

Chris Todd (University of Manchester)

Funding bodies/amount:Dowager Countess Eleanor Peel Trust (£74,907)

Start date:January 2016

End date:July 2017

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Main Project (led by Sathish Sankerpandi):

Both the incidence of falls and the severity of the consequences increase with age. Current body-worn falls-alarms, which alert carers, suffer from poor detection rates. Our recent tests on young volunteers have shown that a novel approach which is based on posture measurement leads to improved detection. Our study aims to investigate this approach in the elderly and also capture information on the type of fall and any potential recovery. Future work will focus on developing a deployable system.

Within this project Chris Pickford will be collecting free-living behavioural data from people with dementia with the aim of applying the results from current work relating to sit-to-stand and stand-to sit transitions (described above). He will also be exploring free-living behavioural data specifically with people with dementia to identify changes in behaviour over time as well as exploring compliance wearing physical behaviour monitors.

Progress to date

Project start meeting occurred on the 8th Feb 2016 with team members from Four Seasons Healthcare, Salford University and Manchester University

Chris has completed, and was granted Salford University ethics. Additional amendments for further data collection have been granted.

Future plans arising from activity

The results and publication will support the application for funding on future bids (e.g.

Alzheimer’s society).

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

The work will hopefully demonstrate the advantage and benefit of activity monitors in care homes for predicting changes in the behaviour and healthy of elderly residents.

The application and use of such activity monitoring would be of huge benefit in the community setting to maintain independent living.

Contact

Chris Pickford

Email c.g.pickford1@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 3316

Malcolm Granat

Email m.h.granat@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 2568

Title of research project/activity

Co-designing augmented board games in aging and dementia care.

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Sam Ingleson – School of Arts & Media

Claire Dormann – Institute of Dementia

Dementia Associates

Start date:Sept 2015

End date:Sept 2018

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

  • To provide opportunities for people living with dementia and carers to engage in a range of leisure activities centred on playful game experiences
  • The creation of augmented board games designed to be used with People living with dementia, their families and care-giver, to support emotional wellbeing
  • To provide a space to stimulate discussion, social interaction and provide activities that encourage the recognition of memories through sensory prompts, playfulness and humour.
  • To engage people living with dementia and their carers in the process of co design practices related to games.
  • To explore the role of digital technology to support, gameplay, the design of socio-emotional experiences and play motivations.

Progress to date

Research has been undertaken focusing on the creation of an initial board game prototype that will allow the researchers to engage with user groups to look at the effectiveness of games as a way of enabling a focused social space whereby conversations and other interaction can take place within the framework of playing a game. We have engaged in a process of iterative design to experiment with different game components (including digital media) to provide a range of multi sensory stimulus and game strategies suitable for players with a range of cognitive abilities and skills. We have now produced the first prototype and are looking at designing further prototypes with different groups and contexts, as well as involving users in this process.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

  • Enhanced Board games for Dementia care
  • Toolkit for carers and caregivers so that localised/ personalised games can be created
  • Enhancing wellbeing of people living with dementia and their carers

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

  • Reframing participatory design in the context of social change games. Proceedings of the Irish Symposium on Game-Based Learning, September 2016
  • Designing Augmented Board Games for Dementia care: engaging families, friends and community (Abstract). Playful Learning Conference, Manchester, July 2016
  • Artefact: Jumble on Juniper Street board game

Contact

Sam Ingleson

Email s.j.ingleson@salford.ac.uk

Claire Dormann

Email C.A.L.Dormann@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Activity monitoring of people with dementia using the activPAL and a home sensor network

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Chris Pickford (Institute for Dementia, Salford University)

Malcolm Granat (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Louise Rogerson (Intelesant)

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

People live their lives according to patterns and routines. Our physical behaviours and the way they change may be used as a predictor of progression to, and within, conditions such as dementia. Understanding how people behave in a free-living setting during periods between carer visits can be difficult and deducing information can be time consuming. Designing intervention strategies to allow people with dementia to continue to live independently requires “baseline” information about what is “normal” behaviour. This type of information is often lacking in dementia research.

Approximately two thirds of people with dementia live at home and one-third in residential care. With the increase in the ageing population, the proportion of people with dementia in residential care is set to rise sharply and current care home facilities will likely be unable to cope. The Prime Minister’s challenge on dementia 2020 states that “…by 2020 we would wish to see: Increased numbers of people with dementia being able to live longer in their own homes when it is in their interests to do so, with a greater focus on independent living”.

In order to keep people living independently in their own homes, they need to be kept safe when their behaviour changes. If changes in behaviour can be accurately recognised, then real-time feedback could be provided to carers.

By using a combination of discrete body-worn sensors and a network of sensors embedded within the home, it may be possible to recognise emerging patterns of atypical behaviour in people with dementia. It is proposed that by using body-worn sensors to record the primary postures of sitting, lying, standing and walking, it will be possible to quantify many aspects of physical behaviour. The use of an embedded sensor network would allow many of the physical activities and bouts of activities with specific interactions within the home, labelling the data in more detail.

Progress to date

We will be meeting with Louise Rogerson from the company Intelesant which has produced a system, “Howz” that monitors the use of individual appliances within the home to build a picture of how appliances are used day to day. This system complements the activPAL monitor which collects person-centric data allowing a complete picture of how a person with dementia functions within the home and critically how their ability to function independently changes with time.

Future plans arising from activity

If successful, the use of the combined platform could be proposed for use in the Dementia Havens project in development. This project has been established by one of the University of Salford’s Dementia Associates Joy Watson.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

The outcomes from this work would give insight in to how people with dementia behave in a completely free-living setting within their home. During periods between carer visits there is a lack of crucial information necessary to understand how dementia is affecting a person’s ability to live independently and how their ability changes with time. Crucial information that could indicate possible red flag situations relating to falls, temperature monitoring and health deterioration (UTIs and infections) could be identified early and discretely using the data from the proposed project.

Contact

Chris Pickford

Email c.g.pickford1@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 3316

Malcolm Granat

Email m.h.granat@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Characterising the sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transition in a free-living setting using body-worn monitoring (e.g. the activPAL activity monitor).

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Chris Pickford (Institute for Dementia, Salford University)

Malcolm Granat (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Andrew Kerr (University of Strathclyde)

Start date:July 2015

End date:ongoing

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

The way we physically move and interact with the environment holds key information about our health, our routines and lifestyle. This free-living behaviour encompasses physical movements that can be recorded using physical behaviour monitors. By dissecting this information, we can determine when a person is sitting, standing, lying and

walking. Comparing activity day after day allows us to predict a person’s habits and allows us to monitor how they change. Such changes can be indicative of progression to and within dementia.

By characterising components of physical movement such as the transition from sitting to standing and standing to sitting, analysis of physical deterioration or rehabilitation can be monitored and appropriate timely interventions planned. In this project we are investigating:

1.   Can the sit-to-stand and stand-to sit transition be characterised robustly using activPAL activity monitor data?

2.   Can we identify differences between the way healthy people transition and the way people

who have suffered a stroke transition?

3.   What are the features of the transition that can be robustly identified and compared between individuals and populations?

Progress to date

Using data from stroke patients (~40, donated by Andrew Kerr) and healthy age matched patients (~25, donated by the Malcolm Granat) we have been able to show a difference in the peak velocity of transitions. We have addressed aims 1 and 2 which are currently being prepared for publication. The algorithm used to analyse the data will be used with data collected from people with dementia as part of a Peel Trust Fall Detection project (PI Malcolm Granat). This data will be collected from residents across the Four Seasons Healthcare network.

16

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Publication in preparation

Poster presentation at the January 2016 Dementia Showcase event

Contact

Chris Pickford

Email c.g.pickford@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 3316

Malcolm Granat

Email m.h.granat@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 2568

Title of research project/activity

From Mediated Clowning to Telematics Entertainment for Dementia Care: Investigation by Practice as Research

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Richard Talbot (School of Art and Media)

Claire Dormann, Institute for Dementia

Funding bodies/amount:

British Academy: £10 000

Start date:June 2015

End date:December 2017

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Assistive technologies are designed to supplement declining physical and cognitive abilities.

These technologies assist people living with dementia performing their daily activities, and

monitoring health and safety. To complement these approaches, we propose a collaboration

between specialists in Performance (Applied Theatre/Comedy) and Games Design/Human

Computer Interaction, to investigate technological applications that enhance the well-being of

both caregivers and people living with mild or early stage dementia. The study aims to

investigate appropriate tools and applications for playful interaction, socio-emotional

experiences, and creativity, through a series of workshops with informed participants and

volunteers. We then plan to evaluate their suitability for people living with dementia and their caregivers.

Progress to date

Development of the project: collection and elaboration of a resources-based database. We

conducted the first workshop on Clowning for Dementia with Ian Cameron that included

performance exercises inspired by work on projects developed by Triangle Theatre, Hearts & Minds (Scotland), and leading clowning practitioners. This is followed by a series of workshops looking at virtual clowning and playful interactive experience for dementia care.

Submitted Funding Proposals:

·        British Academy: Modelling Interactive Clown Practices for Virtual Game Design applications in Dementia care. (£ 9600)

·        Abbeyfield Society, round one : Clowning /Mediated Clowning for Dementia: A Interdisciplinary Investigation by Practice-as-Research (£ 19802)

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

  • Laugher as the best medicine: exploring humor-mediated health applications, InternationalConference on Human-Computer Interaction, Los Angeles, 2-7 August 2015

Future plans arising from activity

  • Evolve conceptual designs for playful experiences and mediated performance
  • Secure further funding: National / EU funding
  • Develop training Workshops for Professional Caregivers
  • Disseminate our research at conferences, symposium event and though a journal  paper
  • Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities
  • Improve Dementia care and well-being of people living with dementia and their carers

Contact

Richard Talbot 0161 295 6367

Email  r.talbot@salford.ac.uk

Claire Dormann

Email  c.a.l.dormann@salford.ac.uk