Salford Institute for Dementia

Research theme: Support and Care

Title of research project/activity

Dementia and Diversity

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Anya Ahmed

Funding bodies/amount (if applicable)

Several including:

Telephone funding (internal university funding) £2500

Camden LBC £8,700

Salford CCG £19,200

Start date: multiple

End date: ongoing

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

A number of projects have been completed and are ongoing in the area of dementia and diversity, under the lead of Anya Ahmed. These include:

Collaboration with Shahid Mohammed (dementia activist and care giver) on producing a briefing paper ‘A Fragmented Pathway: diverse communities experiences of dementia services’ – a review of BME communities experiences of the dementia care pathway

Camden Dementia Aware Project: Raise awareness of dementia among Somali community in Camden and improve access to services.This research produced a model for dementia service provision that is currently being rolled out across Camden

Salford BME dementia study: Raise awareness of dementia among Salford’s BME communities and the needs of BME communities in relation to dementia CPD/training – BME communities and dementia

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Draft briefing paper completed – ‘A fragmented Pathway: Diverse Communities’ Experiences of Dementia Services’

Ahmed, A, Yates-Bolton, N and Collier, E. (2014) Diversity and Inclusiveness in Dementia: Listening Event Report. Salford Institute for Dementia. University of Salford,

Book chapter in ‘Ageing in Contexts of Migration’ Karl, U. & Torres, S. (2015) entitled ‘UK Migration and Elderly Care Regimes’

Co-editing volume ‘Working with marginalised groups: from policy to practice , Palgrave, and contributing a chapter on ‘ Dementia and diverse communities: from policy to practice’

Ahmed, A. & Rogers, M. (October 2016) Working with marginalised groups: From policy to practice , London, Palgrave

Contact

Anya Ahmed

Email a.ahmed@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Independent Living Village – Pendleton Together

Title of research project/activity

Independent Living Village – Pendleton Together

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Marcus Ormerod (School of the Built Environment)

Anya Ahmed (School of Health and Society)

Funding bodies/amount (if applicable):

£3,000 awarded by Pendleton Together, and £3,000 University of Salford

Start date:March 2016

End date:June 2016

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

After several meetings with Pendleton Together and visits to Lombardy Court it has been agreed that an initial evaluation of a pre-determined area within the centre of Pendleton would be assessed to understand in more detail the improvement opportunities of the internal and external environment for the benefit of the independent living cohort.

It is envisaged that this project will consist of three distinct, but linked and evolving phases. Phase 1: An evaluation of the potential impact on People & Place (internal/external) inrelation to independent living both now and in the future of the proposed Extra Care Village Objective 1: To establish the current internal & external environment / facilities within thedefined area of Pendleton that has impact on the independent living/Dementia cohort Objective 2: To assess the short, medium & longer term needs of the independent livingcohort within the defined area in relation to the Master Plan

Objective 3: To recommend baseline measures that would need to be established andpotential research studies to measure the impact on people and place in respect of independent living by the development of an extra care village in Pendleton

Phase 2: Establishing a baseline & designing/measuring & evidencing interventions inrelation to the Independent Living / Dementia cohort (informed by Phase 1)

Phase 3: Evaluating the ongoing impact of the regeneration investment (Informed by Phase1 & 2)

It is envisaged that this will be a medium to long-term (7 years+) collaboration between Pendleton Together, Salford City Council, the University of Salford and the residents and communities of Pendleton to deliver the master plan in relation to independent living and the proposed extra care village.

Contact

Marcus Ormerod

Email: m.ormerod@salford.ac.uk

Anya Ahmed

Email: a.ahmed@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Designing Community Exercise Groups for People with Dementia and Carers

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Kris Hollands (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Tracey Williamson (School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences, Salford University)

Louise Rogerson (Intelesant)

Christine Smith (University of Sheffield)

Frances Arnall (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Chris Pickford (Institute for Dementia, Salford University) Malcolm Granat (School of Health Sciences, Salford University)

Funding bodies/amount (if applicable):

£35551 awarded by Joint Health and Wellbeing Innovation Fund 2015 (Salford CVS)

Start date: December 2015

End date: December 2016

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

(Summary provided by Kris Hollands):

General exercise groups work well in the community e.g. “Healthy hips and hearts” is a very successful programme operating across Salford, with groups run by volunteers. However, for people with mild to moderate dementia these groups can be problematic and these people are not currently attending these groups. Through collaborative engagement with experts at the University of Salfords’ Institute for Dementia, community groups e.g. Age UK Salford dementia team, and patients and carers we will develop a dementia specific evidence-based service of exercise classes. We will trial the exercise classes with approximately 60 participants and provide a report indicating feasibility of delivering dementia exercise classes within existing Salford services. We will further develop a subsequent grant application to NIHR RfPB to fund a formal pilot RCT.

My specific role in this project involves support with use of the activPAL monitors and the analysis of the data from it. Further expansion of my role within the project will be discussed in the coming weeks.

Progress to date

The first workshop was held on the 25th January to gather information from people with dementia, carers and care home staff on what existing exercise strategies are in place and to gauge what potential exercise programs may be feasible and how they could be facilitated.

The team is attempting to source funding to purchase additional activPAL monitors to be used in this project.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

We will/have held discussion forum with service providers (e.g. Salford community leisure who provide community exercise classes, NHS physiotherapists), people with dementia and their carers to determine what they want and need from exercise classes. We have completed a literature review to determine the current evidence for the most effective exercise for people with dementia. We will now blend the needs and wants of stakeholders with the scientific evidence base to design a model of dementia exercise and then trial it for feasibility and acceptability in the community. The design of a model of dementia friendly exercise groups that can feasibly be delivered within existing service pathways in Salford is anticipated to be of great impact to people with dementia, their carers, social services and the NHS.

Contact

Chris Pickford

Email c.g.pickford1@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 3316

Malcolm Granat

Email m.h.granat@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 295 2568

Title of research project/activity

Living well with young onset dementia – Humphrey Booth Resource Centre as a hub of excellence in a system of support

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Tracey Williamson (Study Lead)

Luisa Rabanal (Research Fellow) Andy Walker (Development Worker)

(all in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences)

Funding bodies/amount:£325,000 awarded by the Booth Charities, Salford.

Start date:April 2015

End date:April 2018

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Individuals living with young onset dementia (YOD), defined as those receiving a diagnosis before the age of 65 years, have rarely been involved in research and service development. Consequently, little is known about the needs and experiences of this population. Existing services remain tailored towards older people and may not meet the unique requirements of younger individuals. The implications of receiving a diagnosis of YOD are particularly severe, as people may be coping with many responsibilities including work, supporting children and/or older relatives and major financial commitments. In addition, people who develop dementia in midlife undergo a lengthy and agonising wait for diagnostic test results due to the rarity and range of types of the condition. Specialist services providing individuals with ongoing assessment and professional support at home and in day care remain scarce and patchy across the UK.

The proposed study is a landmark, three year collaborative project between the University of Salford’s Institute for Dementia (SiFD) and Salford City Council to explore the needs of people living with YOD in Salford. The study will take a participatory action research (PAR) approach to engage with a diverse group of people who can each bring their expertise through having YOD themselves or having experience of supporting people living with YOD. This means that younger people living with dementia, their families/friends/carers and existing support services will be involved in the study design, undertaking and management of the research through membership of Steering and Advisory Groups. Study participants will include up to 50 people affected by YOD, together with approximately 35 staff from community service/support settings. The scope for evidence based service developments to occur throughout the study in response to participants’ perspectives will be enhanced by the employment of a Development Worker to work alongside the research team.

Progress to date

Stakeholder Engagement

Extensive meetings between members of the study team and various staff working in health and social care in Salford have taken place since May 2015 to raise awareness and develop effective relationships which will be key to implementing evidence-based findings throughout the lifetime of the study.

Study Advisory Group

The study Advisory Group was formed in July 2015 and consists of eleven individuals comprising six living with a diagnosis of YOD and five family members/carers of individuals

living with YOD. To date three meetings have taken place with the Advisory Group and they have made valuable contributions to the study design, data collection tools and been involved in several productive discussions concerning person-centred and effective ways of involving people living with dementia in research.

Multi-stakeholder Steering Group

The Steering Group was formed in February 2015 and comprises 17 individuals from key health and social care organisations in Salford to help manage the study. The third meeting will take place in March 2016.

Ethical approval

The study obtained ethical approval from the National Research Ethics Service North West – Preston Research Ethics Committee and the Research and Development Departments at both Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust and Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust in January 2016.

Participant recruitment and data collection

Participant recruitment for the study is in progress and the first round of interviews is scheduled for February 2016.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Poster presentations

Williamson, T., Rabanal, L., and Walker, A. (January 2016): Living well with young onsetdementia. Poster presented at the Joint Dementia Research Showcase, University ofManchester.

Williamson, T., Rabanal, L. and Walker, A. (abstract accepted January 2016) Research as occupation with younger people living with dementia, Alzhemier’s Research UK, March

2016, Manchester

Oral presentations

Pearson, M., Williamson, T. and Rabanal, L. (August 2015): Living well with young onsetdementia – Humphrey Booth Resource Centre as a hub of excellence in a system of support. Higher Education for Dementia Network (HEDN) meeting, University of Salford.

Rabanal, L., Williamson, T. and Walker, A. (January 2016): Living well with young onsetdementia – Humphrey Booth Resource Centre as a hub of excellence in a system of support. Joint Dementia Research Showcase, University of Manchester.

Rabanal, L., Williamson, T. and Walker, A. (abstract accepted January 2016) Research as occupation with younger people living with dementia, COTEC/Enothe, June 2016, Northern Ireland

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Current impact

  • One of the Advisory Group members, J. Watson approached L. Rabanal for some support with the analysis of data that she collected for a small personal project regarding public views on dementia villages. J. Watson and L. Rabanal conducted some qualitative data analysis together and this experience contributed to the

development of a proposal with Tracey Williamson to train some Advisory Group members as co-researchers. Funding opportunities are being sought for this project (bid rejected by Averil Obsorn Fund).

  • Detailed information concerning ways of working with people living with dementia in research is being carefully recorded during the Advisory Group meetings. As a result, best practice guidelines will be developed for both conducting research with people living with dementia (e.g. interviews and focus groups) and involving people with dementia in research (e.g. through their role as study advisors).

Anticipated impact

  • The study in Salford will focus on practical solutions which can be developed throughout its life, considering where existing support can be adjusted or enhanced to support younger people living with dementia more effectively.
  • Findings to be shared nationally and internationally through SiFD and Salford City Council networks.
  • Local dissemination through newsletters, meetings, socials and support groups.
  • Academic community via peer reviewed journals and conferences.
  • Practice community via Nursing, Social Work and Occupational Therapy conferences
  • Education - embed findings into curriculum such as MSc Dementia Care and the Enabling Environment

Contact

Tracey Williamson

Email: T.Williamson@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 6424

Title of research project/activity

Evaluation of dementia friendly communities training

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Tracey Williamson (Institute for Dementia)

Hassan Osman, (School of Nursing Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences)

Funding bodies/amount:Alzheimer’s Society (£5,000)

Start date:July 2015

End date:July 2016

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Research consultancy to evaluate dementia friendly community training being delivered by Alzheimer’s Society Manchester in six locations to local businesses and carers. Consultancy helped to develop rigorous evaluation tools, input and analyse data and facilitate three one day listening events.

Progress to date

A range of data collection tools were developed. The majority of data have been analysed. Listening events are planned for summer 2016.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Two publications anticipated

Future plans arising from activity

Further engagement and funding applications with the Alzheimer’s Society

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Guidance on training for dementia friendly communities

Contact

Tracey Williamson

Email T.Williamson@salford.ac.uk 0161 295 6424

Title of research project/activity

Evaluation of dementia friendly environments in Salford

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Tracey Williamson (Institute for Dementia)

Natalie Yates-Bolton (Institute for Dementia)

Kathryn Yates (Institute for Dementia)

Ricardo Codinhoto (Institute for Dementia)

Marcus Ormerod (Institute for Dementia)

Steven Ruddock (University of Central Lancashire)

Funding bodies/amount:Salford City Council (£29,000)

Start date:October 2013

End date:March 2015

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Evaluation of capital works programmes aimed at enhancing environments to make them more ‘dementia friendly’. Research settings included an acute NHS hospital, a mental health

NHS trust and 3 care homes.

Progress to date

The team worked closely with people living with dementia to undertake joint audits of care home and hospital environments. Other methods included individual and focus group interviews. The study incorporated an eight-month follow on data collection period to identify less immediate impact. Findings identified enhanced environments especially where capital works were focused on distinct areas rather than spread thinly across many areas. Signage worked best when consistent graphics and words were used and it was not possible to identify a single signage type for hospital and care home settings as was envisioned by service providers at the study outset. Good practices were highlighted such as managing bedroom moves of care homes residents whilst decorating tool place. Staff training was key to the success of changed environments to ensure they were utilised fully and appropriately.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Final main study report to Department of Health (July 2014)

Williamson, T; Yates-Bolton, N; Yates, K; Codinhoto,R; Ruddock, S and Ormerod, M (2015) Let’s Talk Research conference (paper), September 2015, Manchester

Future plans arising from activity

Development of posters for care homes and best practice guidance to be designed and distributed.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Two papers anticipated

Changed practice in the settings researched and others following dissemination/distribution of best practice guidelines. Foundation for further funding applications relating to dementia friendly environments.

Contact

Tracey Williamson

Email T.Williamson@salford.ac.uk 0161 295 6424

Title of research project/activity

Evaluation of dementia friendly environments UHSM

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Natalie Yates-Bolton (School of Health and Society) Tracey Williamson (School of Health and Society)

Funding bodies/amount:UHSM £30,000

Start date:March 2014

End date:August 2015

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

The aim of the project was to evaluate the outcomes of a £1 million capital investment in dementia friendly environments at the University Hospital of South Manchester. The funding for the capital investment was part of a £50 million Department of Health programme. The project evaluated ward environments and garden environment. People with dementia were involved in the evaluations in partnership with members of the academic team.

Progress to date

The project has been completed and the final report was used by UHSM to report to the Department of Health on the outcomes of the capital investment.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc) Natalie Yates-Bolton presented early findings of the evaluation at the Hammond Care International Dementia Conference, Australia 2014

Future plans arising from activity

Approach to involving staff and people with dementia in the design and evaluation of dementia friendly services to be integrated into future projects e,g, Salford Institute for Dementia hub and external collaborations.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

People with dementia were engaged in the audits of each environment within the project. These individuals are now Dementia Associates of the Salford Institute for Dementia and involved in additional projects.

Contact

Natalie Yates-Bolton

E-mail: n.yates-bolton@salford.ac.uk

Tracey Williamson

Email T.Williamson@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Knowledge Transfer Partnership: Empathic Curiosity communication training for carers of people with dementia

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Tracy Williamson Natalie Yates-Bolton Elizabeth Collier

Six Degrees Social Enterprise (Phil Mc Evoy, Kelly Hilton, Alicia Mangiafico)

Funding bodies/amount:Innovate UK (£165 000)

Start date:August 2015

End date:August 2018

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

  • To evaluate an approach to communicating with people with dementia called Empathic Curiosity.
  • To develop a teaching package to enhance the communication skills of carers of people with dementia.

Progress to date

The academic and company partners have supported the development of the KTP associate. The academic and company partners have established a definitive work programme for the evaluation of Empathic Curiosity. Phase two will involve the development of the teaching package.

Contact

Tracey Williamson

Email t.williamson@salford.ac.uk

Natalie Yates-Bolton

Email n.yates-bolton@salford.ac.uk

Elizabeth Collier

Email e.collier@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Salford Community Christmas Project

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Tracy Collins School of Health Sciences

Funding bodies/amount (if applicable)

The Wellcome Trust £4,845

Start date:April 2015

End date:September 2015

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

The aims of the project were to:

  • Evaluate a community Christmas event (lunch and the opportunity to socialise for people with dementia and their carers on Christmas day).
  • Explore the experiences of the guests and volunteers involved.

Progress to date

Conclusions of the research project:

  • A range of people attended the event for a variety of reasons.
  • The event itself had a positive impact, including the shared experience of social belonging, for both guests and volunteers.
  • There are tangible longer term benefits as a result of the event, such as ongoing contact and the development of supportive networks.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Written outputs:

Collins, T., Kenney, C. and Hesk, G. (2016). ‘It pushed me back into the human race’: evaluative findings from a community Christmas event. Health and Social Care in the

Community. Available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365- 2524/earlyview

Oral presentations:

Collins, T. (2015) Developing and evaluating Christmas events for people with dementia.

Paper presented at the Human Rights and Dementia Conference, MediaCity UK, Salford, 10 September.

Future plans arising from activity

Currently working with collaborators to bid for further funding to evaluate the impact of community Christmas events in other contexts.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Part of the Wellcome Trust grant was used to hold a symposium at the University, 29 July

2015, ‘Developing and evaluating community Christmas events’ for policy makers, healthcare professionals and related communities to share some of the findings of the research: http://staff.salford.ac.uk/newsitem/4752

As a member of The Campaign to end loneliness research hub, I also shared the findings, related to loneliness and social isolation, with other researchers and policy makers at a recent hub meeting 28 October 2015 hosted by the University of Salford.

Contact

Tracy Collins

Email: t.collins@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 29 52399

Title of research project/activity

Ludic Gerontechnology: Digital Games for Dementia Care

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Claire Dormann

Start date:July 2015

End date:July 2017

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Digital technology and in particular assistive technology for people living with dementia focuses mostly on health and safety issues rather that addressing leisure and entertainment needs. This led to an increased interest in digital games to support dementia care, with the development of cognitive rehabilitation and reminiscence games.

The aim of this project is to investigate the role of digital games in dementia care to facilitate and stimulate the design of digital games in this context including educational, therapeutical or entertainment games. Thus a literature review of games around dementia care was carried out. The review brought out a number of design issues and highlighted limitations of on-going development. We advocate stepping out of the functionalistic approach taken in this domain to design enjoyable, emotional and fun game experiences.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Toward ludic gerontechnology, a review of games for dementia care. Proceeding of First Joint International Conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) and the Foundations of Digital Games conferences (FDG), August 2016 (16p).

Workshop on Digital games and Aging (co-organiser), First Joint International Conference of the Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) and the Foundations of Digital Games conferences (FDG), August 2016

Poster: Ludic Gerontechnology and Dementia Care, Dementia Research Showcase,

January 2016

Presentation: Digital games and Dementia, Documenting and Memory: Art and Media Seminar, University of Salford

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

  • New Research Agenda in this context
  • Guidelines for  the design of digital games
  • Enhancing wellbeing of people living with dementia and their carers

Title of research project/activity

Co-designing augmented board games in aging and dementia care.

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Sam Ingleson – School of Arts & Media

Claire Dormann – Institute of Dementia

Dementia Associates

Start date:Sept 2015

End date:Sept 2018

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

  • To provide opportunities for people living with dementia and carers to engage in a range of leisure activities centred on playful game experiences
  • The creation of augmented board games designed to be used with People living with dementia, their families and care-giver, to support emotional wellbeing
  • To provide a space to stimulate discussion, social interaction and provide activities that encourage the recognition of memories through sensory prompts, playfulness and humour.
  • To engage people living with dementia and their carers in the process of co design practices related to games.
  • To explore the role of digital technology to support, gameplay, the design of socio-emotional experiences and play motivations.

Progress to date

Research has been undertaken focusing on the creation of an initial board game prototype that will allow the researchers to engage with user groups to look at the effectiveness of games as a way of enabling a focused social space whereby conversations and other interaction can take place within the framework of playing a game. We have engaged in a process of iterative design to experiment with different game components (including digital media) to provide a range of multi sensory stimulus and game strategies suitable for players with a range of cognitive abilities and skills. We have now produced the first prototype and are looking  at designing further prototypes with different groups and contexts, as well as involving users in this process.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

  • Enhanced Board games for Dementia care
  • Toolkit for carers and caregivers so that localised/ personalised games can be created
  • Enhancing wellbeing of people living with dementia and their carers

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

  • Reframing participatory design in the context of social change games. Proceedings of the Irish Symposium on Game-Based Learning, September 2016
  • Designing Augmented Board Games for Dementia care: engaging families, friends and community (Abstract). Playful Learning Conference, Manchester, July 2016
  • Artefact: Jumble on Juniper Street board game

Contact

Sam Ingleson

Email  s.j.ingleson@salford.ac.uk

Claire Dormann

Email C.A.L.Dormann@salford.ac.uk

Title of teaching activity

MSc / PGDip / PGCert in Dementia: Care and the Enabling Environment

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

The programme is a joint programme across 3 Schools:

Natalie Yates- Bolton (Programme Leader and Lead for School of Health and Society)

Rita Newton (Lead for School of the Built Environment) Tracy Collins (Lead for School of Health Sciences)

Elizabeth Collier (School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences)

Start date:The programme commenced in January 2015 for full-time and part-timestudents. It has 2 points of entry – January and September each year.

Overview of programme aims and selected highlights

The aims of the programme are for students to develop ……

  • A systematic understanding of living with dementia and how approaches to care and design can provide enabling support for people living with dementia and their carers;
  • A comprehensive understanding of current evidence for best practice in care and design for living well with dementia through the critical appraisal of research, publications and service user involvement;
  • Originality in the application of knowledge of care and design that enables living well with dementia;
  • Critical reflection within an interdisciplinary context to inform evidence based dementia practice in collaboration with patient and public partners.

The modules comprise:

  • Developing Dementia Awareness (30 credits): This module examines the evidencebased developments, and the opportunities for inter-disciplinary collaboration to enhance the experience of living well with dementia. (Core Module for PG Cert)
  • Enabling Environments for Living Well with Dementia (30 credits). This module providesa multidisciplinary understanding of the inter-relationship between ageing, dementia, and the environment, and the theoretical models that underpin this. It provides an evaluation of the facets of an enabling environment that contribute to living well with dementia through assisted and independent living by challenging current theories, policies, design approaches and solutions. (Core module for PG Cert)
  • Life Engagement and Dementia: Social Relationships and Meaningful Activity (30credits): This module reviews and develops knowledge and best practice to enhance the support of relationships with, and meaningful activities for, people living with dementia. It also assists you to develop plans for enhancing life engagement throughout the experience of living with dementia.
  • Research methods (30 credits): This module enables the student to develop a rigorousapproach to the process of research, and prepares them to complete a dissertation / research project or systematic literature review.
  • Dissertation (60 credits): The dissertation module provides an opportunity to undertakean in-depth, evidence based exploration of a key area relevant to a students own area of professional practice.

Future plans arising from activity

It is anticipated that the programme will additionally have university approval for distance learning during Spring 2016, with the first cohort of distance learners expected to start in September 2016.

Additionally, the EU funded POSADEM programme (of which the University of Salford is lead) will have online modules from the latter end of 2016. This has the potential for online CPD access by individuals and organisations.

Contact

Natalie Yates-Bolton, Programme Leader

Email: N.Yates-Bolton@salford.ac.uk

Title of teaching/training activity/event

HUROPEL: Erasmus Intensive Programme in Human Rights, Older People and End of Life Care (Euros 250,000 over three years)

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Martin Johnson and Natalie Yates-Bolton (co-leads) (Salford); Universities or Manchester, Applied Sciences Saimaa, Finland; Applied Sciences Carinthia, Austria; Dublin City University, Ireland; University of Pecs, Hungary; University of Bratislava, Slovenia

Date(s) delivered

April 2011 Salford University (2 weeks), May 2012 University of Applied Sciences Saimaa, Finland (2 weeks), April 2013 ( 2 weeks) University of Clermont Auvergne

Number of attendees/students

About 60 on each occasion or 180 in total

Overview of make-up of attendees (e.g. public, professionals, academic etc)

Post and undergraduate students, some service users, health and social care professionals, lecturers, research staff

Overview of activity and/or selected highlights

Seminars, workshops, visits to health care and social care facilities, drama workshops, films, role play, art therapy workshops

Publicity and/or further impact and engagement opportunities arising from activity (if relevant)

Several posters and presentations have been given e.g. NETNEP, June 2014 in the Netherlands

Future planned activities arising

The current POSADEM project, also funded by Erasmus grew out of this work and some of the partners remain but with new ones added

Contact

Martin Johnson

Email m.johnson2@salford.ac.uk

Natalie Yates-Bolton

Email n.yates-bolton@salford.ac.uk

Title of teaching/training activity/event

(2013) POSADEM: Erasmus Lifelong Learning Programme Development Grant

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Johnson, M, Yates-Bolton, N and Collier, E (Salford) and the Universities of Maastricht, Dublin City, Saimia Applied Sciences, Bournemouth, Carinthia Applied Sciences, Austria.

Date(s) delivered

Over 3 years Oct 13-Sept 16. Euros 400,000

Number of attendees/students

Mainly a curriculum development project, but with service user, stakeholder and pilot student involvement (approximately 60 persons)

Overview of make-up of attendees (e.g. public, professionals, academic etc)

Service users, lecturers and researchers, students

Overview of activity and/or selected highlights

Five international workshops to develop advanced curricula in dementia care, with a particularly positive focus

Publicity and/or further impact and engagement opportunities arising from activity (if relevant)

Project completes in September 2016, a launch in Salford is being planned

Future planned activities arising

Partner universities delivering modules produced in various packages and formats. Conference presentations and research outputs, notably stakeholder and service user evaluations.

Contact

Natalie Yates-Bolton

Email n.yates-bolton@salford.ac.uk

Elizabeth Collier

Email e.collier@salford.ac.uk

Martin Johnson

Email m.johnson2@salford.ac.uk

Title of teaching/training activity/event

Human rights and dementia conference

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Martin Johnson (Chair of Planning Committee and Convenor)

Natalie Yates-Bolton

Date(s) delivered

10 and 11 September 2015

Number of attendees/students

140

Overview of make-up of attendees (e.g. public, professionals, academic etc)

Keynotes or Chairs

Lord Kamlesh Patel (Mental Health Act Commission) Alistair Burn (Dementia Tsar)

John Keady (University of Manchester) Ann Johnson and Hazel Blears MP

Overview of activity and/or selected highlights

Alzheimers Care and Education in France (Diewertje Bordat and Muriel Montigaud) Human Rights Law and Dementia (Mme Baudoin, U of Auvergne)

Quality Social Care in France

The law and mental incapacity (Hugh Jones Solicitors) Person with dementia perspective (Ann Johnson)

Carer perspective (Steph Booth with Natalie Yates-Bolton) Dramatisation

Diversity

Human Rights in Care Homes Early Treatment

Human Rights as a Concept Dignity in death

Future planned activities arising

Conference on digital technology to improve care in dementia, contact Natalie Yates-Bolton (n.yates-bolton@salford.ac.uk)

Contact

Martin Johnson

Email m.johnson2@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Florence Nightingale Foundation Leadership Scholarship (£15 000)

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Natalie Yates-Bolton (School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Science)

Overview

The aim of the project is to develop nurses as politically impactful leaders in an area of patient care. Natalie has identified the collaboration between the University of Salford and Dementia United as the work based focus for this scholarship.

Progress to date

Natalie has a year of bespoke training as a leader from January 2016. This will include attending a residential course at Harvard Business School

Future plans arising from activity

Throughout the year Natalie will develop collaboration between the University and Dementia United

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Enhanced collaboration across the University through the Salford Institute for Dementia and external partners

Contact

Natalie Yates-Bolton

Email: n.yates-bolton@salford.ac.uk

Selected Engagement Activities/Events

Associates Meetings/ Events

Dementia-friend sessions

Posadem

Training- SPD

Good-Life festival (Associate involved event)

Accompanying Associates with events/conferences etc

Events /promotional work.

Team members involved

Claire Marrett, Natalie Yates-Bolton, Martin Johnson, Elizabeth Collier, Tracey Willamson, Luisa Rabanal , Andy Walker, Rita Newton, Marcus Omerod, Claire Dorman, Sam Ingeson

Date(s)

General meetings with Associates have been quarterly. Have had celebrations/gatherings in the interim periods.

Human Rights conference, September 2015.

Accompanied Ann Johnson to Austria for Posedem in September.

Fortnightly meetings with a small group of Associates and Alzheimers Society

Attendees include

People living with dementia, Carers, Students (nurse students), Housing Association Staff, General Public, Fund-raising staff

Publicity and/or opportunities arising from activity/event

Engagement with School of Built Environment and Arts and Media with the Associates. Telephone fund-raisers trained as dementia friends and awareness of the aims, research and activities of the Institute.

Future planned activities arising from activity/event

Further training sessions for Associates. Developing the role and increasing the profile. Event in March for showcasing living well with dementia.

Volunteers trained as Dementia Friends and roles developed. Further community work

Work with Associates

The Institute works closely with a team of 15 Associates. These are people living with dementia as well as carers of people with dementia. The team meets quarterly to discuss issues, activities and ideas and have close links with the Alzheimer’s Society. The team are involved in planning events, celebrations, and conferences. They also input to research projects, from initiating ideas through to research design, data collection and analysis, and dissemination. The team provides a core advisory role to the Young-Onset research project. The Associates are involved in several teaching opportunities, including the Institute’s MSc Dementia; Care and the Enabling Environment, Salford’s Nursing pre-registration programme and the POSEDEM teaching initiative.

The Associates are currently planning a Good-Life Festival – a living well with dementia conference, a Dementia Awareness Week, working on a film about dementia services in Salford, and ensuring promotional material for the Institute is dementia appropriate.

Contact

Claire Marrett

Email c.l.marrett@salford.ac.uk

Title of engagement activity/event

Dementia Cafe

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Claire Marrett

Natalie Yates-Bolton

Andy Walker

Date(s):Monthly since June 2015

Number of attendees (approximate if unknown)

Almost 40 people living with dementia attend

Overview of attendees

Various including; people living with dementia and carers; professionals from the Institute; dementia associates; volunteers; Dementia Services staff from around Salford; Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service staff; Salford Museum and Art Gallery staff; Members of the public

Overview of activity/event and/or selected highlights

Each month there is a presentation, often by someone living with dementia. A chance for people to showcase their hobbies. And an activity that is dementia -friendly

Publicity and/or opportunities arising from activity/event

The Cafe is publicised by the Salford Memory Team and other dementia services in Salford as part of the Salford Dementia Road-map journey.

Opportunities for people living with dementia to chat to staff from the Institute. Inter-generational activities.

Dementia Associates support new members of the cafe.

Through working with the Estates team, the building and staff are becoming more dementia friendly. Accessibility and way-finding for people with dementia has improved.

Recruitment of student volunteers for the cafe.

Contact

Claire Marrett

Email c.l.marrett@salford.ac.uk

Amanda Jervis

Email: a.jervis@salford.ac.uk

Title of research project/activity

Human Rights of people with dementia

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Nicolas Kang-Riou, Salford Business School

Marie-Elisabeth Baudoin, Université d’Auvergne, France

Start date:April 2015

End date:ongoing

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Main aim: determine how the law can improve the enjoyment of human rights of persons with dementia.

In order to do so the following elements are looked at:

  1. Produce a legal conception of the individual which will fully take into account how dementia transforms the individual’s capabilities over time
  2. Determine the extent of the protection offered under existing human rights law to persons with dementia
  3. Select key areas (i.e. legal capacity, rights in residential care, employment rights…) where the current law is problematic with regard to the human rights of persons with dementia

Progress to date

I have delivered (alone or with Marie-Elisabeth Baudoin) conference presentations on all elements a, b and c. (See below)

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

‘Legal capacity, dementia and art 12 CRPD’, poster presented in April 2015 in Perth, at the Alzheimer’s Disease International Conference

‘Revisiting the right to autonomy of older people in care homes from the lens of relational autonomy’, Paper presented at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Law and ageing of mankind workshop, London, June 2015

‘The European Protection of the Human Rights of People with Dementia’ presented at the

Human Rights and dementia conference in September 2015, co-authored with ME Baudoin

Future plans arising from activity

All 3 presented papers are to be written-up and submitted for publication in 2016 to relevant journals.

Erasmus funded teaching visit to the University d’Auvergne to deliver 8 hours of lecture on the human rights of persons with dementia to PG students, April 2016. It will also be the occasion to finalise the paper co-authored with ME Baudoin.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Participation in the Network for social sciences and dementia, led by the French Foundation Mederic Alzheimer (Paris). I have attended a one day workshop in Paris in September. Made new contacts and will work further to see if there are any common research action which could be done.

I have offered to produce a ‘shadow’ report, on behalf of the Institute, for the next Universal

Periodic Review of the UK human rights commitments by the UN Human Rights Council. This report will highlight the specific human rights issues faced by persons with dementia in the UK. The report could be used to influence policies and provide a broader view of the human rights challenges confronted by persons with dementia.

Contact

Nicolas Kang-Riou

Email n.kang-riou@salford.ac.uk

Tel 0161 2956869

Title of research project/activity

Neighbourhoods and Dementia.

Work-programme 4: Neighbourhoods: Our People, Our Places

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Andrew Clark, School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences, University of Salford

Richard Ward, University of Stirling (Work Programme Lead)

John Keady (Principal Investigator), University of Manchester

In total the programme has twenty-seven named co-investigators from 10 organisations.

Funding bodies/amount (if applicable)

£4million awarded by ESRC/NIHR to John Keady (University of Manchester) and the Neighbourhoods and Dementia team

Start date:May 2014

End date (if applicable):May 2019

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

This Work Programme is part of major interdisciplinary research initiative overseen by Prof John Keady (University of Manchester) exploring how neighbourhoods and local communities can support people with dementia to remain socially and physically active. Work Programme 4 will work closely with people with dementia and their carers to find out what their neighbourhood means to them, the different ways it supports them, and what could be changed to make life better. In the first stage of the research are spending time with people with dementia and carers asking them to show us around their neighbourhood and to tell us about the people in their lives who help them out. As part of a longitudinal research design we are revisiting the same people after 6-12 months to talk to them again.

The research is being undertaken in three different areas: Forth Valley (Scotland); Greater Manchester (England) and Linköping (Sweden). The different teams will compare their results and findings and we hope the outcome will lead to positive changes at a local level for anyone affected by dementia.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Written outputs

Keady, J. and the Neighbourhoods and Dementia team (2014): An Introduction to the

ESRC/NIHR ‘Neighbourhoods and Dementia’ mixed methods study. Journal of Dementia Care, 22(6)

Oral presentations

Clark, A., Burgess, J. and Campbell, S. (2015) Dementia Friendly Neighbourhoods. Invited to present at Alzheimers’ Society Annual Conference, Manchester.

Clark, A. and Campbell, S. (forthcoming, 2016): Looking out for and looking in on: how do people with dementia experience neighbourhood life?. Paper to be presented at British Society of Gerontology annual conference, Stirling.

Clark, A. (2016): Neighbourhoods and dementia.  Invited to present at ‘ Dementia@Manchester: “From Cell to Society” 3rd Annual Research Day’  University of Manchester. 30th June 2015

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

The work-programme has an extensive set of engagement practices and events. Notably, following data collection, we will work with local dementia care practitioners and organisations alongside people with dementia and their carers to design a neighbourhood-based approach to support and the co-ordination of services. For this intervention we hope to involve a whole range of different local groups, organisations and companies. We will closely monitor progress and evaluate the intervention to find out what impact it has. The work-programme involves people living with dementia in every stage, from research design to piloting methods to developing interventions and their subsequent evaluation.

Contact

Andrew Clark

Email: a.clark@salford.ac.uk

Tel. 0161 29 54109

Title of research project/activity

A Place Called Happiness…? Exploring the neighbourhood experiences of carers for people with dementia in Salford

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Andrew Clark (School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences)

Richard Ward (University of Stirling)

Matthew Hargreaves (Manchester School of Architecture

Funding bodies/amount (if applicable)

Manchester Interdisciplinary Collaborative for Research on Ageing (MICRA).

Start date:January 2010

End date (if applicable):September 2011

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

Debate about ‘dementia friendly communities’ has raised important questions about the ways in which local networks can offer support to those affected by dementia. Such a prospect is all the more significant given findings from recent research that those with dementia experience a ‘shrinking world’: gradually losing the confidence to venture too far from home. Consequently, places and people close to home can play an increasingly important role in providing help and support. This research project investigated the relevance of local places and people to carers and former carers of people with dementia in order to understand: What does neighbourhood means for those living with dementia?; How those affected by dementia draw on localised and informal networks for support?; And what can be done locally to better support people living with dementia and their carers?

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Written outputs

Ward, R & Clark, A & Hargreaves, M 2012, 'What does neighbourhood mean for people with dementia? ', Journal of Dementia Care, 20(2).

Ward, R., Clark, A. and Hargreaves, M. (2011) A Place Called Happiness…? Exploring the neighbourhood experiences of carers for people with dementia in Salford. Briefing Paper.University of Manchester.

Ward, R. and Clark, A. (forthcoming, 2016): Negotiating Neighbourhood: Methods for investigating the emplaced experiences of carers for people with dementia. Forthcoming book chapter

Oral presentations

Ward, R. and Clark, A. (Oct. 2013): The lived experience of the neighbourhood for carers of people with dementia. Presented at the 23rd Annual Conference of Alzheimer Europe,Malta.

Clark, A., Hargreaves, M. and Ward, R. (May 2012): ‘It just looks like a field to anybody else’:

Interdisciplinary perspectives on the role of neighbourhood for people affected by dementia.

Invited to present at Re-thinking dementia: Multi-disciplinary perspectives on understanding dementia in everyday life. Manchester.

Clark, A. and Ward, R. (Sept. 2012): Getting out and about: neighbourhoods as sites of support for people affected by dementia. Presented at Dementia Design Conference,University of Salford.

Clark, A. (Nov. 2011): Picturing Place: health, environment and methodological creativity.

Presented at Health Ecology Symposium: Using Space to Address Health and Welfare Issues. University of Salford & University of Bangor.

Clark, A. and Ward, R. (Sept. 2011): Dementia Care-scapes: Networks, neighbourhoods and informal care. Paper presented at Proximities: Thinking about Relationality, University of Manchester.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

Since completion this research has been up-scaled as part of a European programme of research investigating the role of the neighbourhood in the everyday lives of people with dementia and their families. The ‘Neighbourhoods and Dementia’ programme is one of six research programmes announced by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) along with the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), as part of a £20 million funding boost that will significantly add to the understanding of dementia. The programme runs from April 2014 until May 2019.

Contact

Andrew Clark

Email: a.clark@salford.ac.uk

Tel. 0161 29 54109

Title of research project/activity

Decision-making among male carers of people with dementia.

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Michelle Sampson

Andrew Clark (School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences)

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

This research stemmed from Sampson’s MA in Human Rights and Ethics research around autonomy and decision-making in the context of dementia. Empirical research was gathered through interviews with male carers of people with dementia to understand the ways in which decision-making is negotiated, undertake or deferred at a range of temporal scales.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Written outputs

Sampson, M. and Clark, A. (2015): ‘Deferred or chickened out’?: Decision-making among male carers of people with dementia. Forthcoming in Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice, DOI: 10.1177/1471301214566663.

Contact

Andrew Clark

Email: a.clark@salford.ac.uk

Tel. 0161 29 54109

Title of research project/activity

Metrics Project: Establishing the current evidence-base for the holistic model of environments for dementia

Team members and School(s)/other institutions involved

Peter Barrett (strategic overview)

Monika Sharma (built environment)

Rita Newton (built environment)

Kate Walters (quality of life / levels of care)

James Chandler (quality of life)

Chris Pickford (technology)

Funding bodies/amount:Via Dowager Countess Eleanor Peel Trust

Start date:February 2015

End date:February 2018

Overview of research aims and selected highlights

To establish the current state of the evidence bases for impacts on the well-being of those living with dementia in the main areas of the holistic environmental model. And so to identify the foundations to build on and the gaps to be filled and from this to be able to design and prosecute research that delivers new insights and knowledge on the holistic impacts of rich environments. The focal environments are: social and physical with a parallel effort on assessing the adequacy of metrics of quality of life. The Holistic environment model is as below:

Holistic Environment Model

Progress to date

Internal draft literature review reports carried out in the areas of QoL, care environments, built environments and technological environments. Meetings held to discuss and share the findings so far and further work carried out or in hand to establish models of the intensity of support for those living with dementia, provided in each element of the total environment.

Outputs (papers, book chapters, conference presentations, poster presentations etc)

Initial findings regarding extensive gaps and the lack of a sound evidence base for much received wisdom infused the research strategy and helped establish the distinctive contribution the Institute plans to make so aiding the Wolfson bid.

Future plans arising from activity

It is anticipated that an over view paper will be written drawing on the separate reports and that this will then provide a synthesis element to the draft reports above that together will make up an Institute working paper.

Impacts (or anticipated impacts) and/or engagement activities

The holistic model and these efforts to work through its development into actionable metrics for future research has consistently excited stakeholders and should provide a sound basis for future bids. The paper, carefully written up in a good quality journal has the potential to be influential in pointing the way forward in a novel and potentially productive direction.

Contact

Monika Sharma (from April 2016).

Email m.sharma@salford.ac.uk