Dr Catherine Thompson

Dr Catherine Thompson

Lecturer in Psychology

Office Times

Please email for office hours and appointments. 

Biography

Catherine is a Lecturer in Psychology and she joined the University of Salford in 2010. Catherine obtained her undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Lincoln; she then went on to work at the University of Manchester on a project funded by the ESRC. Following this Catherine completed an MSc in Psychological Research Methods, and her PhD at the University of Nottingham. Afterwards, she worked as a post-doctoral researcher on an ESRC-funded grant at the University of Nottingham investigating visual attention in the driving task.

Teaching

Catherine is module leader for the Cognitive modules on the undergraduate Psychology programmes.

Research Interests

Catherine's research focuses on visual cognition and her main areas of interest include how observers allocate their attention effectively and what factors influence selection. This includes limits in the control of attention, the impact of a preceding task on the allocation of attention, and the influence of emotion and environmental factors on congnitive performance. 

Publications

Bendall, R.C.A. & Thompson, C. (2015). Emotion has no impact on attention in a change detection flicker task. Frontiers in Psychology,6(1592), 1-9.

Thompson, C., Howting, L. & Hills, P. (2015). The transference of visual search between two unrelated tasks: Measuring the temporal characteristics of carry-over. Quaterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 6, 1-19.

Thompson, C. & Crundall, D. (2011). Scanning behaviour in natural scenes is influenced by a preceding unrelated visual search task. Perception, 40, 1335-1349.

Thompson, C., Underwood, G., & Crundall, D. (2007). Previous attentional set can induce an attentional blink with task-irrelevant initial targets.Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60 (12), 1603-1609.

Thompson, C. & Crundall, D. (2011). Scanning behavior in natural scenes is influenced by a preceding unrelated visual search task. Perception, 40, 1335-1349.

Thompson, C., Underwood, G., & Crundall, D. (2007). Previous attentional set can induce an attentional blink with task-irrelevant initial targets. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60 (12), 1603-1609.