Dr Maggie Scott

Lecturer in English Language & Literature

Office Times

Please contact me via email for an appointment


Before coming to Salford in 2008, I worked as a historical lexicographer for ten years, originally for the Historical Thesaurus of English at the University of Glasgow, then the Oxford English Dictionary at Oxford University Press, and latterly for Scottish Language Dictionaries (SLD) in Edinburgh. In 2005, I established the ongoing regular weekly newspaper column, ‘Scots Word of the Week’, for SLD, published in the Scottish broadsheet The Herald, and wrote it for three years (2005-2008). While based in Scotland, I taught at several academic institutions including the English Language Department at the University of Glasgow; the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (now the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland); and the University of Edinburgh’s Department of Celtic and Scottish Studies. My PhD at the University of Glasgow analysed place-names of Old English, Norse and Scots origin in the south of Scotland, and I was editor of Nomina, the journal of the Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland for six years (2008-2013).


I currently teach several modules relating to the study of English Language and Literature, including the introductory module ‘Language Through Literature’ at first year level, the modules ‘History & Diversity in English’ and ‘Attitudes to English’ at second year level. I also teach a specialist module on name studies, ‘The Language of Names’, and a module on Medieval Literature, ‘The Medieval World’, both at third year level. I contribute to the delivery of MA modules including ‘Antony Burgess and His Contemporaries’, and would be interested in supervising students working on the history of English, the Scots language, onomastics (name studies) and lexicography.

Research Interests

My current research is divided between several areas of focus. I continue to work on the origins, history and perceptions of Scottish place-names, building on the work of my thesis. I am interested in the uses of the Scots Language more generally, particularly in post-devolution Scottish contexts, including Literature. I also continue to pursue lexicographical research, building on my previous experience working for the two major historical dictionaries of English and Scots; at present, I am examining the unpublished manuscript dictionary of ‘Arms, Armour and Costume’, compiled by Charles Relly Beard.

Qualifications and Memberships

MA (Hons) English Language and Literature, University of Glasgow (1997)

PhD Linguistics, University of Glasgow (2004)

Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education, University of Salford (2010)

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (2010-)

Member of the English  Association, Member of the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, Member of the Modern Language Association, Member of the Dictionary Society of North America, Member of the professional society for Teachers of Old English In Britain and Ireland, Member of the Scottish Place-Name Society, Member of the Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland, Member of the Association for Scottish Literary Studies


(forthcoming, 2015) ‘Names and Dialectology’. In C. Hough (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Names and Naming. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

(2014). ‘Scottish Slang’. In J. Coleman (Ed.), Global English Slang (pp. 107-115). London: Routledge.

(2012). ‘Capitalising on the City: Edinburgh’s Linguistic Identities’, Collegium: Studies Across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences, 13, 115-131. < 10138/38602/13_06_scott.pdf?sequence=1>

with Andrew Clark (2011). ‘Directions in English Place-Name Studies: an invitation to debate, with a case study of Salford Quays’, Nomina: The Journal of the Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland 34, 27-50.

with Joshua Pendragon (2011). 'A lexical skirmish: OED3 and the vocabulary of swordplay'. In O. Timofeeva and T. Säily (Eds.), Words in Dictionaries and History (pp. 269-286). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

2010 ‘Rethinking the Concise Scots Dictionary for the 21st Century’. In J. Considine (Ed.), Current Projects in Historical Lexicography (pp. 113-130). Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.